Should You Sacrifice Your Dreams? Mar30

Should You Sacrifice Your Dreams?...

In Edge of Spider-Verse #2, Peter Parker is dead. Gwen Stacy is Spider Woman, riddled with guilt over his demise, and she finds herself overwhelmed with the prospect of her double lives. In a culture that constantly tells me to chase my dreams no matter what, this comic sends a different message. As Gwen is swinging through the streets chatting with her dad on the phone (hands-off devices recommended when you’re Spider-Woman), he encourages her to leave her band and go to college. At this point, he’s unaware she’s Spider-Woman and is juggling her dreams with a host of other responsibilities. “I love music, Dad. It’s all I’ve ever wanted to do,” she says. “I know, honey,” he replies, “and the things we love are always worth fighting for. But everyone has something they want. What is it the world around you needs? What is it that only you can give?” I instantly rebel at reading this line, because everyone knows you’re supposed to put individual dreams above everything else. It’s why university students jump between majors until they discover their passion. It’s why people switch jobs when they don’t love their work any more. It’s why advertisements tell me I’m worth it. It’s why Gwen plays in a band instead of attending university, and why she becomes Spider-Woman in the first place—to avoid responsibility and do what she wants. But maybe there’s something to Captain Stacy’s advice. Maybe I should consider what I can offer others instead of just what I want for myself. I want my innermost desires and the unique things I can offer to line up, but they don’t always. Sometimes these decisions come up in small ways, like running an errand for a friend when I’d rather be at home...

MCU Watchlong – Captain America: The Winter Soldier...

Dig our your Thomas Paine literature, it’s another MCU Watchalong! Join Jason, Dustin Schellenberg and Kyle Rudge as they watch through one of the most critically acclaimed movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Captain America: The Winter Soldier! Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @GeekWrites Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Episode 121 – Krakens are the Best Support Class...

The only podcast that took a virtual Kraken as a pet, it’s Infinity +1! Join Kyle, Justin and Kyla wax on about the thing that means the most to them in this week’s Question of the Week before they talk about the game that has taken over the internet. Then in the second segment, they discuss Caitlin Eha’s article, Feeling Inadequate as a Support, and the value of supporting others. The music in the break is “It’s Not Old Skool It’s Classic” by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Justin’s Twitter: @TheKoop13 Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on YouTube: Geekdom House Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Let the Guy in the Chair Be Your Guide Mar26

Let the Guy in the Chair Be Your Guide...

“Can I be your guy in the chair?” When Ned finds out that his buddy Peter Parker is actually Spider-Man, he wants in on the action. He puts himself forward as Peter’s self-appointed “handler;” the guy who tracks Peter’s movements and provides information just in time. This proves both useful—and comic—at the climax of Spider-Man: Homecoming when Peter is battling the Vulture and Ned provides backup from the school library. Ned shuttles between computers using a rolling office chair, tracking Peter’s phone, calling Happy Hogan and telling Peter how to find the lights on the car he’s appropriated. Thrilled to be helping, Ned blissfully exclaims, “Guy in the chair!” Ned is just the latest in a long line of “guys in the chair” in pop culture. Where would Kim Possible have been without Wade? Neo, Trinity and Morpheus would have been lost without Tank manning the switchboard on the Nebuchadnezzar. Without Chloe O’Brien, Jack Bauer wouldn’t have made it through eight seasons and three movies. Tony Stark needed help so badly that he built Jarvis. The price of ignoring my conscience and other sources of wisdom can be high. And I’m a little jealous. What I wouldn’t give for my own personal “guy in the chair.” When I leave for work, my guy would tell me traffic conditions and the quickest route. When I need data in a meeting, he’d have it ready. At the grocery store, he could inform me if I’m getting the best deal and how to tell a ripe melon from a dud. Forget battling villains, having a “guy in the chair” available 24/7 would be a huge time saver. A “guy in the chair” is a lot more than just a source of information, though. He can also be...

Reading Ready Player One: Teamwork Mar23

Reading Ready Player One: Teamwork...

Ultimately, the last chapters of Ready Player One contain its strongest message: victory is not only for the strong; it goes to those who maintain hope, those who love, and those who remain faithful to one another, even to the bitter end. Without the hope and tenacity of Parzival/Wade, for example, who was willing to give up his life in the last section to save his friends, and who maintains that mindset until the end, our heroes would never have been able to overthrow their opposition. Without Og’s love for and faith in Halliday, the ephemeral creator of the OASIS, the spirit of the game would have been lost to the greed and divisiveness of the Sixers. And without the faithfulness and teamwork of Shoto, Artemis, and Aech, Wade never could have made it past the Third Gate. The Sixers, on the other hand, though they move as a massive, powerful corporation, make the fatal error of rejecting even the premise of teamwork. At the core of the IOI’s identity is domination, which cannot be present in the loving and unified. Unwilling to work together or sacrifice himself for his “team,” Sorrento views his cronies as expendable; this is clear when his avatar is killed, and Wade imagines him “kicking one of his underlings out of a haptic chair so he could take control of a new avatar.” Nothing is more important to the Sixers than winning the egg, because the egg and its subsequent wealth symbolizes domination for them. For Wade and company, the egg means something quite different. They are each fighting against the powers that be to preserve the value of the individual, the value of the overlooked. When small forces of good join together to fight against daunting forces of...

Feeling Inadequate as a Support Mar21

Feeling Inadequate as a Support...

Receiving the nickname “vomit boy” is not a promising beginning for a would-be hero. Neither is forging school transcripts or succumbing to the demands of a bully. In short, Jaune Arc’s early days at Beacon Academy are anything but an inspiring origin story. From its first episode, RWBY’s main character has always been Ruby Rose. In spite of the show’s large cast, Ruby stands apart from the rest and garners the most screen time. In some ways, Ruby and Jaune are not so different: they enter Beacon together, become team leaders, and go through most of the same adventures. But whereas Ruby was allowed into Beacon two years early because of her fighting prowess, Jaune can barely hold his own on the battlefield. Ruby is everything Jaune wishes he could be: an exceptional fighter with a state-of-the-art-weapon. In other words, hero material. In Volume One, Jaune wrestles with a lot of frustration. Although he knows he’s not a strong fighter, he feels embarrassed when his teammate, Pyrrha, offers to help him train. “I don’t want help!” he tells her. “I don’t want to be the damsel in distress; I want to be the hero!” Because of his pride, Jaune pushes away Pyrrha and his other teammates—just in time for Cardin, Beacon’s resident bully, to learn that Jaune lied his way into Beacon. Cardin blackmails Jaune into all kinds of dirty work, making him less of a hero than ever. Jaune’s always played a supporting role, not because he’s second-best, but because that’s where he belongs. Finally, Cardin threatens Jaune’s teammates. For the first time, we see Jaune’s heroism when he stands up to Cardin in defense of his friends. In the aftermath, Jaune becomes humble enough to ask for Pyrrha’s help. His friends’ need...

Episode 120 – Gratitude For The Abundance Of Fish...

Only half as lame as Speedy,  it’s Infinity +1! Join Jason, Allison and Kyle look past the top of the poster to the heroics of their favourite non-protagonists in the Question of the Week before a very special Conundrum to commemorate an important announcement in today’s episode. Then in the second segment, Matt Civico looks at how Dirk Gently approached the idea of hero and sidekick in Playing The Sidekick: Dirk Gently’s Holistic Humanity. What is the role of a truly great sidekick? How can we balance being the hero of our own lives and the sidekick in the lives of those we love? Why is Speedy the worst sidekick in DC history? Listen on and find out! The music in the break is “It’s Not Old Skool It’s Classic” by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @GeekWrites Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Geekdom House on YouTube: Geekdom House Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

The Ancient Magus Bride demonstrates Happiness and Love are Not Equal Mar19

The Ancient Magus Bride demonstrates Happiness and Love are Not Equal...

The first two rights in the Declaration of Independence, life and liberty, have always been givens for me. But the last, the pursuit of happiness, is something that requires striving for. As a child, I did everything I could to attain it, playing video games, spending time with friends, and of course, always searching for sweets. As an adult, I haven’t changed much. I’m still pursuing happiness, even if candy isn’t what elicits that feeling (well, not always). But happiness isn’t the ultimate goal for everyone, and maybe I focus on it too much. In The Ancient Magus Bride, a moody but absorbing anime about a teenager thrust into the world of magic and fairies, none of the main characters are particularly happy, but neither are they actively reaching for that goal. For them, happiness is rather an occasional by-product of more foundational pursuits. And considering the fleeting nature of happiness, I think these characters have it right. In a world of pain and suffering, the ability to endure and even thrive is a strength I desire to have. As the series begins, an abandoned and defeated Chise, the eponymous bride, has given herself to slave traders who sell her at a magical auction. Elias, a refined but fearsome figure (he has what appears to be an animal skull for a head incised with glowing red eyes), purchases her and tells her that she will become his bride and pupil, learning how to become a magician like him. After he rescues Chise, she quickly grows to care for Elias, though outward expressions of delight are seldom seen between them. Other members of their household find similar contentment. Silky, a banshee who lost the loved ones she previously haunted to a house fire, finds quiet...

Reading Ready Player One: Courage Mar16

Reading Ready Player One: Courage...

Wade’s bravery in this section blows my mind; as someone who has historically taken the safe route instead of the sacrificial one, his courage is foreign to me. But Wade puts himself in unimaginable danger almost without a second thought. Though some might see his willing “surrender” to IOI and indentured servitude as reckless, one particular line from Wade makes me think otherwise: “I didn’t test the IOI passwords until the second night of my indenturement. I was understandably anxious, because if it turned out I’d been sold bogus data and none of the passwords worked, I would have sold myself into lifelong slavery.” Wade knows the stakes. At this point, he is no longer simply an avatar, someone who is brave in the OASIS and cowardly in the “real world.” What he has built up in the OASIS has now come to fruition in his being: Parzival’s bravery has become Wade’s. When I step back and consider how Wade is leaving the safety of his lifelong pacifier, the only place where he has ever felt ‘himself,’ I can see how monumental his act of courage is. And though it might seem like his courage initially falters when he is led outside into the pallid desolation of the real world, his fear is not an unexpected thing. And Wade’s fear can exist alongside his courage. His entire identity is in the OASIS, but he is willing to give all that up on the chance that he can infiltrate IOI and save his friends. Though he is tagged like livestock, confined to a jail cell, and forced to work a mind-numbing job, he still sticks to his plan, maintains his humour, and pulls off what can only be considered a great escape. Stepping outside the...

Three Super-Heroines Who Understand the Struggle Mar14

Three Super-Heroines Who Understand the Struggle...

Like most people, I have dozens of responsibilities weighing on me every day. It’s hard to juggle them all, but even harder to feel confident in the process. I wonder, did I do well enough? Did I devote my attention to the best places? When I read comics where superheroes struggle with the same ordinary issues that I do, I feel less alone, and three of these role models stick out to me as women who wrestle with finding balance in their lives. Spider-Gwen: Using Responsibility to Avoid Responsibility After being bitten by a radioactive spider, Gwen Stacy dons a mask and becomes the Spider-Woman of Earth-65 (an alternate reality Earth). When she looks back on this decision, she says, “All I wanted was to be happy. To have fun with my powers.” Gwen’s “fun” turns to tragedy when she fights the Lizard, only to discover the monster is actually her friend, Peter Parker. Peter dies after the fight, and a grief-stricken Gwen realizes that being Spider-Woman is more than just a game. Even after she takes her heroic duties seriously, Gwen struggles to manage responsibility in her regular life. She uses her secret identity to escape from life as Gwen Stacy, who is having issues with her father and her friends. Crime-fighting as Spider-Woman gives Gwen something to run toward, so she can lie to herself about the fact that she’s running at all. It’s Spider-Ham, of all characters, who eventually tells her, “being a super hero is way more than facing bad guys…sometimes you gotta face real life.” One day, to keep from being late for work, Gwen swings through the streets as Spider-Woman, only to encounter the police, who are trying to arrest her. As she flees, Gwen calls her dad,...

Episode 119 – River Rituals...

The only podcast to cheat on the Voight-Kampf test, Infinity +1! Join Jason, Allison and Kyle as they examine the blind spots in each of their nerd repertoires in the Question of the Week, before sharing the Saved Files that have been keeping them busy as of late. Then in the second segment, we look into the gritty future with Jen Perry’s article, Samurai Jack and Being Valued In Another’s Eyes. How do physical rituals ground us in metaphysical beliefs? Why do we owe each other love and mercy when it is in our best interest to not extend them? Why can’t we all have a magical samurai sword? Tune in to find out! The music in the break is “It’s Not A Keygen” by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @GeekWrites Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Geekdom House on YouTube: Geekdom House Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Playing the Sidekick: Dirk Gently’s Holistic Humanity Mar12

Playing the Sidekick: Dirk Gently’s Holistic Humanity...

As the word suggests, sidekicks are, by nature, to the side of a story. They’re the Robin to Gotham’s Batman or the Watson to London’s Sherlock, supportive helpers who sometimes need rescuing. Yet being a sidekick is simply a role to be filled, not a fixed status or a title someone is born into. Sidekicks are never just assistants. And in Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency, Gently’s “assistant” is a key player in a (hilarious) drama that isn’t always—or only—about him. In the TV show inspired by the Douglas Adams’ novel, Todd Brotzman is a bellhop with exceedingly bad luck—or is it good luck? Either way, the Universe decides to make Todd a part of its plan by bringing Dirk Gently into his life. From where the audience is sitting, this is Todd’s story; he’s the character we get to know first and we relate to him because he is just as confused about the show’s weirdness as we are. But it isn’t a story about Todd; it’s about the Universe and Dirk’s relationship to it. Dirk constantly reminds us of this by referring to Todd as his “assistant,” a title that brands him as a sidekick even though we see the world through Todd’s eyes. Though Todd finds himself playing the sidekick almost against his will, I often put myself in a similar role on purpose, choosing to support leaders or help others reach their goals in an attempt to avoid the weight of responsibility. But I’m a sidekick with a hero-complex—I want to swoop in and fix the problem or spout the wisdom that saves the day. I doubt I’m alone in this paradox, feeling the tension of not wanting the protagonist’s responsibility but thirsting for the glory of a leading role....

Reading Ready Player One: Friendship Mar09

Reading Ready Player One: Friendship...

What’s worth more than seven billion dollars? Wade can’t think of anything. He believes his chance of winning Halliday’s Easter egg is gone when Sorrento and the Sixers are the first to clear the Second Gate, and he doesn’t see much point in living in a world that IOI controls. But then he gets a visit from Shoto that changes his perspective. Daito and Shoto, or “Daisho,” are one of the great duos in nerd culture, in my opinion—up there with Fred and George Weasley, or Han Solo and Chewbacca. You don’t find one without the other. They proclaim themselves brothers, even though they’d never met in person. Though only one person can win Halliday’s prize, Daito gives up his opportunity to collect the Jade Key to protect Shoto. These displays of friendship make Daito’s real-world death heartbreaking, and I bet Shoto feels at least partly responsible, since their team-up is what helped them stay at the top of the leaderboard. Maybe he’s wondering if their friendship was worth pursuing when it ended in tragedy. Maybe he’s tempted to shut himself off from the world again, like he did before meeting Daito. But he makes a different choice. Shoto doesn’t meet Wade to tell the story of Daito’s death just to warn him about IOI and its real-world reach; he could’ve sent him a video or an email to accomplish that. He also didn’t need to tell Wade his real name, which not even Daito knew. But something about this tragedy made Shoto reach out. For some reason, he is completely honest with Wade, and a bond is forged. IOI’s challenge is a personal one, now, and perhaps Shoto’s vulnerability and honesty—something none of the hunters have attempted with each other until this point—will...

My Soul for a Suit of Armour: A Supernatural Response to Grief Mar07

My Soul for a Suit of Armour: A Supernatural Response to Grief...

Grief is debilitating. It clouds my judgement. It breaks me, tearing off pieces of my heart and revisiting after I hoped it had left for good. Staying at my grandparents’ house recently, I was overcome by emotions because of my grandpa’s death. He died a year ago, and I miss him. If I could do something to get him back, I would. If I could hear his voice again and it would ease the pain, even for a second, I would jump into the TARDIS to do so; I’m not sure even the threat of tearing time apart would stop me. People respond to the death of loved ones differently. Some seek retribution out of anger. Like Inigo Montoya from Princess Bride, they dedicate their lives to hurting the one who hurt them. Others try to force the grief away. Like Rose Tyler from Doctor Who, who attempts to reverse her father’s death, they’d do anything to get a happy ending. Characters who deny their grief often end up paying horrible prices. Just ask Edward and Alphonse Elric from the Fullmetal Alchemist (and the more faithful to the manga, Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood) anime series. At a young age, Ed and Al lose their mother. In desperation, the two boys attempt to resurrect her with a forbidden alchemic spell. As a result, Ed loses an arm and a leg, and Al loses his entire body. Ed manages to attach his brother’s soul to a suit of armour, and they are left to deal with the consequences of meddling with death—their losses only compounded by the contorted corpse of the woman they love. The brothers wanted a fast way to solve their problems. They knew they felt sad—sad to the breaking point—and they wanted the horrifying emotion to go away. Who doesn’t? Grieving is a process, and at such a young age, they may not have understood that. Many adults don’t, either. There is arrogance in the brothers’ actions—they thought they could cheat grief and death when no one else had ever done so—but they were ignorant as well. On the other hand, Dean Winchester from Supernatural knows exactly what he’s doing when he makes a similar decision. He’s dealt with crossroad demons before and knows the price of striking a deal with one, but does so anyway because he wants to save his brother, Sam. His motives are similar to those of the Elric brothers; he’s acting out of intense grief, love for the deceased, and the fear of being alone in the world. Several times, Dean has lost Sam. Each time has been as devastating as the next to him as he can’t bear the thought of being without his little brother. He makes so many deals with demons and other supernatural beings, that he actually becomes blackballed from ever making such deals again. With each deal he strikes, the cost is high. He constantly puts his own life and humanity on the line, which may mend the problem of losing Sam, but causes more grief than good to Dean, Sam, and those around them. To respond irrationally to grief, to run away from horrifying feelings, is to be human. No one wants to feel unhappy. No one wants to miss someone so much that their chests hurt and they have trouble breathing. However, how we respond to loss impacts our mental health and influences how we react to others experiencing similar situations in the future. Ed and Al learn from their mistake—from attempting to bypass the grieving process—and when they encounter a young woman who has lost her lover, they understand why she wants to bring him back from the dead. When she sees that Al doesn’t have a body, Al says, “This is my punishment for setting foot on holy ground where mortals are forbidden. We made a mistake, Rose. And we’re paying for it.” When she...

Episode 118 – Home Is Where The Vibranium Is...

Once you’ve heard it, you can’t unhear it, it’s Infinity +1! Join Jason, Allison and Dustin Schellenberg as they share tales of BioWare and the longest games they’ve ever played before starting into the void over what their favourite dystopia is in the Question of the Week. Then in the second segment, we dive back into the incredibly subtextual Black Panther with Dustin’s article,  Black Panther Invites Us To Make Homes For Those Without. What does Black Panther say about the importance of home? What does home mean to you? How can I get a pair of Shuri’s panther blasters? Listen on and find out! The music in the break is “GB Hauz” by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @GeekWrites Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Geekdom House on YouTube: Geekdom House Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Samurai Jack and Being Valued in Another’s Eyes Mar05

Samurai Jack and Being Valued in Another’s Eyes...

Though it’s not his preference, it’s Jack’s job to live by the sword. He’s a Samurai, but he tries to complete his mission with as little violence as possible. Jack’s goal: to prevent Aku from destroying everything good in the world and save his family’s empire. However, he gives every monster and villain he faces an opportunity to repent, even letting them walk away unharmed if they do so. It’s with this attitude that he faces Ashi, one of the Daughters of Aku who are trained as assassins to kill Jack. He treats her with compassion when she is used to a life devoid of love or kindness. She has been treated as an indistinguishable cog in a fighting machine; not cared for, not recognized for her gifts, just an agent of death used to accomplish her father’s evil plan. During her training, little glimpses of beauty in the midst of cruelty distracted her (which she was severely punished for). What was being beat into her didn’t sit right in her heart. But it was all she knew, so she tried to be the best assassin she could be, and excelled at it. When Jack goes out of his way to avoid killing her, even saving her life, she is surprised. As she continually tries to kill him, Jack offers her mercy, opening her eyes to a truth she had only caught glimpses of throughout her life. Because of Jack’s kindness toward her, and having observed his care for strangers, Ashi begins to see her own value in his eyes. Ashi can’t help but see the difference between Aku’s evil and Jack’s selfless service to the vulnerable. Truth assaults her heart, turning it away from her murderous plans and toward Jack. Because of Jack’s...

Reading Ready Player One: Loneliness Mar02

Reading Ready Player One: Loneliness...

Everything falls out beneath him after Wade confesses his love to Art3mis. Art3mis, full of concern about the basis of their relationship and desiring to put the contest for the egg as her focus again, ends all connections with him. Heartbroken, Wade retreats into frustration and sadness before diving headlong back into the contest. He buys state of the art equipment, shaves every inch of hair off his body (don’t ask), and spends day and night trying to decipher the clues that will lead him to the next piece of the puzzle, the jade key. But even with a singular focus in his life again, Wade doesn’t seem any happier. He longs for something more, something beyond what he can disguise under an avatar and username. Virtual reality can only provide him so much; it doesn’t cover the dissatisfaction Wade feels with who he is outside of the OASIS: “In real life, I was nothing but an antisocial hermit. A recluse. A pale-skinned pop culture-obsessed geek. An agoraphobic shut-in, with no real friends, family, or genuine human contact. I was just another sad, lost, lonely soul, wasting his life on a glorified video game.” Before he met Art3mis, Wade seemed content with living a life focused on his desires and wishes. What changed? Wade’s obsession with the hunt for the egg is understandable. Who doesn’t want to play endless video games and watch your favorite pieces of media day in and day out, with only yourself to worry about? A hedonistic lifestyle is all about pleasure; why worry about others when you can live in self-indulgence? Living for you brings elation in the moment, but it’s what happens afterwards that sucks, when you feel a sense of emptiness, when all that energy you poured...

Call for Pitches: Disability and Illness Mar01

Call for Pitches: Disability and Illness

Area of Effect is currently looking for pitches on the theme of Disability and Illness. Pitches must have a strong connection to a sci-fi, fantasy, or comic-based TV show, movie, book, video game, or anime. Deadline Pitches are due March 12. Payment We pay 25 CAD for articles that are accepted and published. Guidelines Send a one-paragraph pitch, NOT the full article. Include links to three samples of your published writing. Keep in mind our audience is an eclectic bunch of geeks with differing perspectives on faith and life. Though our articles are written from a Christian perspective, they invite discussion between people of different beliefs. Read some of the current features on our home page to get a handle on our style. We do not want devotionals, Bible studies, or reviews, but rather articles that analyze, interpret, and discuss fandoms in relation to life, faith, and social justice. Include a two-three sentence bio that clarifies why you are qualified to write on this topic. If your pitch is selected, completed articles should be 700-1000 words. Send your pitch to allison@geekdomhouse.com with the subject line: “AoE Pitch: Disability and...

MCU Watchalong: Thor: The Dark World...

Sharpen your hammers it’s time to go back to Asgard! Join Jason, Michael Boyce and Kyla Neufeld as venture into one of the less-lauded entries in the MCU to see what it has to offer us. Put on your Dark Elf ears and join us as we Watchalong with Thor: The Dark World! Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @GeekWrites Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Black Panther Invites Us to Make Homes for Those Without Feb28

Black Panther Invites Us to Make Homes for Those Without...

There are few things in the world more precious than home. When I’m there, I can be exactly who I am. I don’t have to put on a good face to be accepted—I can just be me. I don’t have to dress a certain way or agree with a certain ideology. I am loved and safe and valuable even if my wife disagrees with me or my children are angry. Home is safe. It should be, anyway. For many people, the places that should be home—family, community and country—have been undermined or destroyed. Oppression, racism, and systemic violence have denied people security and love. Too often, this is a direct result of the racism the villain in Marvel’s latest movie, Black Panther, is afflicted by. Erik Killmonger grows up in the streets of Oakland without a father, denied a connection to a loving home, land, and family. He sees the oppression and suffering of people like him, rooted in Africa but displaced, and so sets out in anger and vengeance. It’s difficult to respond with grace when someone is angry and bitter. The worst part about Killmonger’s villainy is that his anger is justified. His rage over people’s suffering is understandable. He is angry because people are dying and others could have done something about it, but didn’t. This frustration and anger fuels a need to make a change, which he believes can only be accomplished by from others. And yet this path of vengeance won’t make the world a better place, even if it makes him feel better. T’Challa, a.k.a. Black Panther, recognizes Killmonger’s intent and does not deliver a killing blow in their final fight. Instead, he offers healing. Yet with his final breath, Killmonger says, “Bury me in the ocean with...