Bad Blood in Captain America: Civil War Mar22

Bad Blood in Captain America: Civil War...

Did you have to do this? I was thinking that you could be trusted. Did you have to ruin what was shiny? Now it’s all rusted. In early 2016, somebody remixed the Captain America: Civil War trailer with Taylor Swift’s song “Bad Blood.” The result was amazingly effective and highlighted the film’s central theme—it’s easier than you think for good friends to turn into bitter enemies. The Avengers have fought side-by-side through two films; stopping the Chitauri invasion and defeating Ultron. Not that they always got along; Tony Stark and Steve Rogers clearly favoured different ways of doing things. When all was said and done, though, they set aside those differences and stood together against a common enemy. That camaraderie ended in Civil War. After a mission goes sideways in Lagos and several humanitarian workers from Wakanda die as collateral damage, Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross tells the team that they can no longer act independently. The forthcoming Sokovia Accords will place the team under direct UN control. Tony and Steve suddenly find themselves in conflict. The hard choice is to value the relationship over “winning” the argument. “We need to be put in check! And whatever form that takes, I’m game. If we can’t accept limitations, we’re boundaryless, we’re no better than the bad guys,” Tony argues. Steve counters, “If we sign this, we surrender our right to choose. What if this panel sends us somewhere we don’t think we should go? What if there’s somewhere we need to go and they don’t let us? We may not be perfect, but the safest hands are still our own.” Just like that, two friends—or at least colleagues—pull away from each other and start staking out territory as enemies. I’d like to think that I’m...

Putting the “Special” in Holiday Dec16

Putting the “Special” in Holiday...

There are a few franchises that get away with what Star Wars could not, but here are a few stories that none have attempted (yet). The Avengers Advent Spectacular Tony Stark whips up a high-tech light display and turns the Avengers HQ into a Christmas tree for the city. The Hulk and the Black Widow star in a touching remake of The Gift of the Magi where he gives up his superpowers to buy her bullets and she pawns her gun to buy him an ultra-stretchy pair of pants. Captain America complains about how Christmas was better when he was a scrawny kid. When Bucky Barnes shows up, he and Cap sing a sweet duet of The Little Drummer Boy. And Harvey Korman appears as a cross-dressing intergalactic TV chef. Battlestar (Christmas) Carol-actica It’s Christmastime in the fleet and Commander Adama just isn’t feeling the spirit of the season. He’s too focused on feeding and protecting the survivors of the Cylon massacre. Apollo tries to get him to lighten up, but is chased off by Adama’s cries of “Humbug!” That night, in his quarters, Adama is visited by the ghost of Colonel Tigh, who mysteriously died just in time for the Holiday Special. Tigh warns Adama that he’ll be visited by three specters. In quick succession Adama’s sleep is disturbed by visitations from Gauis Baltar, President Roslin, and Number Six. Just as he’s about to give in and reclaim his Christmas spirit, Adama realizes that it’s a Cylon trick. He finds and destroys the Basestar and proves that grumpiness is a true superpower. The show ends with Harvey Korman appearing as a cross-dressing intergalactic TV chef. Doctor Who Christmas Special The Doctor… wait a minute.  We live in the universe where the Doctor Who...

Iron Suit, Human Man: Abandoning Tony Stark Nov28

Iron Suit, Human Man: Abandoning Tony Stark...

As much as I like Pepper Potts for her stubbornness and her willingness to stand up for herself, I was shocked at her treatment of Tony Stark in Iron Man 3. She wakes him up because he is literally shaking from a nightmare, and then—understandably, I’ll admit—almost has a heart attack when one of his armored suits appears at the foot of their bed. But after that she storms off, saying she’ll “sleep downstairs.” I can’t help but put myself in Tony’s shoes, trying hard to protect the one I love most and that same person pushes me away. Having the one person I needed to be there leave me in disgust, not understanding what I’m going through, not eventrying to understand. Perhaps I shouldn’t be so hard on Pepper, though, for I know something that she does not. Tony is going through post-traumatic stress. It’s not something we often think our favorite superheroes are experiencing, but Stark’s PTSD actually paves the way for many of the plot points in the later movies. He becomes obsessed with protecting the world, which results in Ultron’s creation in Avengers: Age of Ultron. By Captain America: Civil War, he is even more anxious and sleep-deprived. Many fans were also heartbroken to find out that Pepper had left him at this point. . . . This post was originally published on Christ and Pop Culture. Read the full article...

Hymns and Heroes: 10 More Matches Made in Heaven Nov18

Hymns and Heroes: 10 More Matches Made in Heaven...

Ask and ye shall receive! Here are ten more hymn-meets-hero matches made in heaven, because we believe in the power of resurrection here at Geekdom House (whether for Jesus, Gandalf, or a mashup list). See Part 1 of this list here. 1. Sonic the Hedgehog — “There is a Green Hill Far Away” Twenty-five years far away, in fact. And boy, do we hope Sonic Mania brings it back. 2. Pit (Kid Icarus) — “The Fight is On” Step 1: Insert Smash Bros. Brawl. Step 2: Select Pit. Step 3: Press “up” on the D-pad. Step 4: Continue as directed until all opponents gang up to pound you into silence. 3. Pick an Age of Ultron Avenger, any Age of Ultron Avenger — “Be Thou My Vision” This isn’t the first time we’ve made this pun, and it won’t be the last. (Maybe next time we’ll apply it to Daredevil instead…) 4. Ichigo Kurosaki — “The Call for Reapers” He answered that call in the dubbed version. 5. Eren Jaeger — “Fire of God, Titanic Spirit” Sink your teeth into that colossal pun. Seriously, though, we just want to hear him rage his way through the lyrics in Titan-ese while he’s on fire. 6. Pikmin — “I’ll Go Where You Want Me to Go” “Except when I see a pellet. Or get stuck behind a bridge. Or decide to get lost 20 seconds before launch.” 7. Glorfindel/Arwen — “Ride On! Ride On in Majesty!” Or, as we elves say, “noro lim!” 8. Solaire of Astora — “Praise the Father; Praise the Son” And engage in jolly charismatic worship. 9. Haruka Nanase — “Take Me to the Water” We bet he only sings freestyle. 10. Thor — “The God of Thunder and the Lightning” “This hymn, I like it. ANOTHER!” We can just see Thor hurling a...

A Vision of Loyalty Nov16

A Vision of Loyalty

Is there ever a time when loyalty could hurt? Loyalty the glue that bonds relationships together. Without loyalty it is difficult to have a friendship at all. Many of the Avengers are profoundly loyal to each other. Steve Rogers and Bucky come to mind as prime examples. But as for Vision and Tony Stark—I believe their loyalty to each other is dangerous. Vision is a mix of human and machine, the body made by Ultron and the consciousness created by Tony Stark. Vision is loyal to Tony, mostly since half of his identity is made from Jarvis, Tony’s artificial intelligence butler. In Captain America: Civil War, he sides with Tony, not necessarily because he believes that what Tony believes is right, but because of loyalty. He does what Tony wants because they’re friends. There’s an ongoing saying that we become who we spend time with. We tend to pick up our friends’ character traits—from their way of speaking to their morals. But loyalty shouldn’t mean conformity. Our friends shouldn’t define our beliefs. After Bucky was turned into the Winter Soldier, he completely changed from the loyal best friend of Steve Rogers to a cold-hearted killer. If it wasn’t for Cap’s loyalty and perseverance in their friendship, he probably would have continued down a dark path. One of the most powerful scenes in Civil War for me was when Cap grabbed onto the helicopter and pulled it back onto the landing pad. He was not going to let Bucky go. He was not going to give up on him, and in the end, his influence won Bucky over. I want to be liked. I want to please. Therefore, when I’m around other people I try to fit in. Throughout my life, I have let my...

I Have Strings Sep19

I Have Strings

Before Age of Ultron released, I never noticed much depth in the song “I’ve Got No Strings.” I thought it was just another silly Disney song. However, when I heard the eerie version in context of Age of Ultron’s trailer, it gained an entire new meaning. For both Pinocchio and for Ultron, this innocent-sounding piece is a song of rebellion, of throwing off strings of control and conformity. “I’ve got no strings to hold me down. To make me fret to make me frown. I had strings but now I’m free. There are no strings on me.” Our society often encourages me to yank off the strings of how we’ve done things in the past, to embrace new ideas and desert traditions. This is evident in new political movements, shifting of media, and changes in lifestyle. Sometimes this is a good thing. Society is moving away from racism, poverty, and recognizing things that were swept under the rug, like the sex industry or mental illnesses. However, in exchange for our newfound enlightenment, traditional values of basic morality are dying. What wasn’t okay a hundred years ago is commonly accepted now. This is evident in nearly any TV show or movie or even the news. Once upon a time, commonly relationships were kept chaste until marriage, now it’s common to be sexually active whether you’re in a relationship or just having a one-night stand. Swearing used to be considered lower class, but now it is common. Crude humour was considered impertinent and vulgar; now it’s in every sitcom. With this cultural shift, I’m prompted to join the masses and conform. I don’t want to feel excluded; I don’t want to be left behind. But are these strings that tie me to tradition and the old-fashioned bad?...

Hope for Loki Mar23

Hope for Loki

I’ve always had a soft-spot in my heart for supervillains—maybe it’s because of my Catholic upbringing, maybe it’s because I want everyone to be happy, or maybe it’s because deep down I know that under the right (or wrong) conditions, I could have become one myself. No villain has a more special place in my heart than Loki. He’s the god of mischief, and we all know and love mischievous characters (Fred and George, anyone? Jack Sparrow? River Song?). There is something redeeming in their character—something loveable. And I mean, Loki’s not really a bad guy, right? Sure, he tried to kill his brother and father; sure, he tried to take over the Earth… but can you blame him? Every effort he makes to subjugate anyone is sort of sad—he lashes out like a spoiled child looking for approval, grabbing at the respect he believes he deserves by force because he doesn’t believe he can get it any other way. It’s pitiable; mostly because if he had accepted the true forgiveness and affection that is constantly offered to him by his family, he might have used the burden of his “glorious purpose” for something great instead of attacking the Earth. Plus, can someone who loves his mom so much be completely irredeemable? Everybody has a backstory, everybody has trauma, sadness, disappointment—and not everybody is equipped to deal with their feelings in the same way. Whether you’re a superhero or a villain, something happened to get you there and depending on what resources you had to assist you in recovering from it, you might have done better or worse. Bruce Wayne had Alfred, Clark Kent had great adopted parents, the X-Men had Xavier. Who did Loki have? You can see that Loki wants to believe that he can be forgiven...

Be thou my Vision May20

Be thou my Vision

There’s nothing science fiction loves more than a saviour. All our favourite stories seem to depend on the chosen one who will come and defy the otherwise unconquerable odds, leading the good guys to a lasting victory against the dark and sinister group against whom they fight. Never tell me the odds. Sometimes these saviours are unlikely heroes, thrust into the spotlight, left to rely on a colourful cast of friends to survive the first two acts before discovering who they were meant to be all along. Sometimes they emerge from the womb a certified badass and leave a trail of blood, brass and bodies behind them on their way into the heart of darkness. No saviour ever made a difference without giving their life, literally or figuratively. But every once in a while, a saviour is born into a story as an unexpected hero. A saviour like Vision. Whether you believe the stories about him are true or not, Jesus—as a character—was the perfect and archetypical saviour. A poor child born connected to the king’s bloodline, but with no money or political power. He was nothing like the priests of the time wanted or expected, and in fact, Jesus basically told them they were doing everything wrong. Replace first century Jerusalem with twenty-first century New York City, and Jewish priests with a murderous, all-knowing artificial intelligence, and Vision is Jesus. He is created as a combination of the pinnacle of technological achievement, and the closest thing Tony Stark has to a son, Jarvis. Ultron’s dream for Vision was as his right hand—a sword of judgement to be wielded from the throne over the world. But when Vision awoke as the very embodiment of an Infinity Gem, he was something else entirely. He was the...