Darth Vader, Baby, and Me Dec16

Darth Vader, Baby, and Me...

As I wait impatiently for The Force Awakens to be released, I find myself looking at myself and the way I attend church. I start to wonder: why can’t I be this impatient and excited about Sunday mornings? It’s been a very long time since I have found myself filled with the kind of excitement at church as I find when watching the newest trailers from Disney. And that’s starting to make me nervous. You see, I’m a new dad. Three months ago I was introduced to the most amazing human being I’ve ever met. She drools on me, pukes and poops all over me and I’m in love. She wakes me up at three in the morning, every morning, and yet I can’t wait to spend another day with her. Getting up and leaving the house to go to work has never been this difficult before because it means I might miss the next big step in her growth. And I’ve almost never before been this excited to show my favorite things to someone new. I can’t wait until she’s old enough for me to introduce her to Star Wars. I want to watch her amazement as she sees Luke trust the Force for the first time and turn the Death Star into rubble. I hope to see her shock and awe when she discovers that Vader didn’t actually kill Anakin Skywalker. (Spoil it for her and I will find you.) And I want to relearn through her what it’s like to fear for someone else’s safety when she sees Palpatine turn his power onto Luke. As an adult I’ve never once held the same attention to a pastor as I have to Lucas’s imaginary world. And this bothers me. Yet I’m not...

Episode 11 – Star Wars Holiday Special Dec15

Episode 11 – Star Wars Holiday Special...

THE FORCE AWAKENS IS ALMOST HERE! We’re a little excited about it. In this Infinity +1 episode, we talk about favourite Star Wars memories, weapons, ships, and our hopes and fears for The Force Awakens. Let us know what yours are in the comments! Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes now! Feedburner link:...

Faith like Obi-Wan’s Nov16

Faith like Obi-Wan’s

When was the last time Obi-Wan turned on his lightsaber before he gave it to Luke on Tatooine? This was the question I asked myself when I watched A New Hope recently. I’d never really thought about it before. I’d watched the first Star Wars movie many times but never really looked at old Ben Kenobi, in that hermit’s hut, as anything more than the wise old mentor who guides Luke on his journey through the Force. Obi-Wan, as far as we know, has been on Tatooine in hiding, watching over Luke since the events of Revenge of the Sith. That’s about 19 years of combing sand out of his beard and screaming at Sand People to get off his yard. The movies don’t tell us what he was doing for all those years. It’s easy to forget that the bearded sage in hooded robes was once a warrior. And not just any warrior. Obi-Wan Kenobi was a High Jedi General in the Clone Wars. He led scores of clones through dozens of battles, not from the helm of a capital ship, but from the front lines, lightsaber blazing. He commanded the Open Circle Fleet and the entire Third Systems Army. He was one of the greatest duellists in Jedi history, having achieved near mastery of the highly defensive Soresu lightsaber form. He survived single combat with Darth Vader, Count Dooku, Darth Maul, General Grevious, Asajj Ventress, Savage Opress and countless others on multiple occasions. No other Jedi can boast the same.What does it take for a man to lay down his life, his identity for a purpose not his own? Obi-Wan was one of perhaps 100 Jedi who evaded the execution of Order 66, and one of only a handful to survive for more than a few years in its wake. And he gave it all up. The Jedi were once viewed as infallible paladins by the galaxy, but the Empire had polluted their image into nothing more than corrupt religious monks. Obi-Wan Kenobi, one of the greatest Jedi Guardians since the Jedi Civil War, exiled himself to watch over the son of his fallen apprentice because he knew if he didn’t, the Jedi Order would die out. What must it have been like, for all those years, to hear of the Empire enslaving and dominating the galaxy and be powerless to help? Knowing Luke was the one to carry on the legacy of the Jedi, but having to wait until he was ready to carry the burden? For a warrior to lay down his blade is no simple thing—to unlearn a lifetime of combat, war, and death. Obi-Wan spent much of his exile in meditation with his former master Qui-Gon Jinn who appeared to him through the Force. Over the years, Qui-Gon taught him how to act as a living conduit for the Force and eventually how to retain part of his essence after death. Obi-Wan accepted his new role as mediator and mentor to Luke. Their journey took them onto the Death Star and when that new hope seemed at its dimmest, Obi-Wan stood before Anakin Skywalker, his fallen brother. The same man Obi-Wan had risked his life for countless times demanded it one final time. He ignited his well-rested lightsaber; it must have been something to hear the soft hum again, to wield his blade as a warrior one last time. He moved like he once did, felt the Force stretch out and guide his steps. It wasn’t long before he realized what he must do. “If you strike me down, I shall become more powerful than you can possibly imagine.” Smiling, he raised his blade and allowed Darth Vader to attack without distraction. And with that simple act, one of the greatest Jedi of the age vanished into thin air, denying the Sith Lord the satisfaction of a fight.What must it have been like to...

There is ANOTHER Skywalker Aug07

There is ANOTHER Skywalker...

After watching the Star Wars saga unfold, some might believe Luke is the hero of the tale. Those people are wrong. Luke is a vitally important character to the story, but he really exists to bring about the inciting incident in the third act of the real hero: Anakin Skywalker. And I can prove it by explaining how the Force works. The Force is the mystical life energy that gives Jedi Knights and the Sith their superhuman abilities. It is also much more complex than the Star Wars movies would have viewers believe. The Force is identified in Jedi teachings as having two distinct but symbiotic faces: The Living Force and the Unifying Force. The Unifying Force is treated similarly to “God” in the Star Wars universe. It is a cosmic entity high above all life, possibly having played some role in life’s very existence. It has no physical form, but exists within all life. When light exists so must darkness. The Living Force is what we see on the screen. This is the physical manifestation of the aethereal power. It is the arm of the Force that interacts with the physical world. From my Christian perspective, or even from a Muslim one, that could be defined as the “Holy Spirit.” Other faiths may describe it as mandala or something akin to an avatar. When Obi-Wan leaps 50 feet into the air or Count Dooku projects bolts of lightning from his hands, it is the Living Force being accessed. Throughout the movies we hear references to the “light side” and “dark side” of the Force, which ultimately implies that the Force has some guiding moral characteristic. Should one delve into the nerdy depths of Force lore (as I have), this belief does not hold...

The X-Wing will rise Jul30

The X-Wing will rise

Sometimes you find a place that is so inspiring that every time you go back you discover something new. Something powerful. Something that connects with you. There is a place like that for me in The Empire Strikes Back, on an unassuming planet called Dagobah. I remember the first time I saw the misty swamp of Dagobah. I remember how I felt. My father took me to see Star Wars: Episode V when I was a boy. That powerful scene where Luke fights Darth Vader in the cave impacted me to such a degree that I was convinced the Sith lord was right behind me, that any moment I would hear his rasping breath. But what draws me to the story is not just the exhilarating lightsaber fights, the chilling carbonite, or the Millennium Falcon (my dream ship). I am most intrigued by how the small, wise, green Jedi Yoda trains his eager student, Luke Skywalker. I believe that the X-Wing can and will rise. And the more I look back on it, the more I revisit that bog in Dagobah, the more I begin to understand why. Luke originally goes to Dagobah because he sees a vision of Obi-Wan telling him to do so. Talk about a leap of faith, especially since Luke is possibly going crazy from almost freezing to death at the time. When he gets there, Luke’s X-Wing crashes into the bog on Dagobah. He meets Yoda and then tries to use the force to lift his ship out, but he fails and watches the X-Wing sink. Luke: Oh, no. We’ll never get it out now. Yoda: So certain are you. Always with you it cannot be done. Hear you nothing that I say? As a Christian watching this film, my faith is encouraged each time I see this scene. There is something in the exchange between Yoda and Luke that is a cryptic reminder of exchanges Jesus has had with me. I’m reminded of times when I’ve questioned what I believe in and when I’ve had to trust someone. Of believing that what someone says is true even if the circumstances appear to indicate otherwise. Of trusting in a power far greater than myself to accomplish things I could not hope to do on my own. Somehow the challenges Luke goes through in understanding the Force are similar to the challenges I face in understanding God. Like Luke, I know there is much more for me to experience. And like Luke, I need to be willing to stay in training to exercise my faith. It challenges me to ask what I really believe about Jesus’ words in the Bible. When he says, “Greater works than these will you do because I go to the Father,” do I believe that? Do I believe Jesus’ words, or am I more like Luke’s response: Luke: Master, moving stones around is one thing. This is totally different. In the problems I face, do I look to Christ’s words and say that it was fine for him to work miracles back in the day, but somehow his miracle working power, the true “Force,” has faded over time and can’t be used today. But Yoda disagrees. Yoda: No! No different! Only different in your mind. You must unlearn what you have learned. “Only different in your mind. You must unlearn what you have learned.” Instead of believing Yoda, Luke finds a new excuse. I’ve done this before, too. I’ll find an excuse to avoid doing something I know is right. And it’ll seem like a perfectly good excuse too, just like Luke telling Yoda that lifting the ship with the Force is impossible. Luke: I can’t. It’s too big. Yoda: Size matters not… Yoda reflects Jesus’ wisdom:  “Nothing is impossible for those who believe.” Luke has reached the end. He does not believe. Then he watches Yoda use the force...

A tetractys for TK421 Jun17

A tetractys for TK421...

Why aren’t you at your post? If only you would go to target practice, like we ask Why can’t you accomplish this single task? I have no clue Why aren’t you at your post?

Star Wars books for kids May04

Star Wars books for kids...

So you want your kids (or nieces or nephews or cousins) to love Star Wars as much as you do? Consider reading some of these series with them. I grew up reading these and they still have a fond place in my heart. In honour of May the 4th, you might want to check some of these out! 1. Junior Jedi Knights by Nancy Richardson This series is about Han and Leia’s son (that’s right) Anakin, his friend Tahiri, and their adventures while training at the Jedi Academy. R2D2 is along for the journey as well, of course. When you’re done these, try the Young Jedi Knight series, which is about Han and Leia’s older children, twins Jacen and Jaina. 2. Jedi Apprentice by Jude Watson Ever wonder what Obi-Wan was like as a kid? Short answer: he was awesome. But to find out why, you’d have to read the Jedi Apprentice series. It begins with Obi-Wan being sent away from the Temple because he passed the age he was supposed to be accepted as an apprentice and Qui-Gon refused to take him on. 3. Galaxy of Fear by John Whitman Tash and Zak, survivors of the destruction of their home planet Alderaan because they were off world at the time, accompany their uncle around the galaxy as he studies sapient races. And they encounter some really scary things. Seriously. These books are creepy. But for some reason, I couldn’t read enough of them as a kid. Watch out for cameo appearances by some classic Star Wars characters. What were your favourite Star Wars books to read as a...

The battle of cute and deadly Mar27

The battle of cute and deadly

Tired, old Yoda was strolling along through the Dagobah swamp like nothing was wrong when suddenly Mega Gnar popped out of the mist and pummeled into Yoda with his great, big fist Yoda force-shoved him back, Gnar landed on his feet Gnar leapt away through the air as they both felt the heat of a lightning bolt crashing between them on the ground and Pikachu came tumbling through the air with the sound of “Pika!” he cried as he zapped Gnar away then “Kupo!” Mog the moogle chose to join in the fray for a moment there was silence, when from out of the fog sinking teeth into Mog’s ear was the Rabbit of Caerbannog Then River Tam, Skull the Troll, Reepicheep, Krtek the mole, Mogwai Gizmo, the Duck of Doom, May Chang’s panda and Rocket Raccoon shouted “for Narnia!” and “Bring the pain!” and “I can kill you with my brain.” Killua Zoldyk sauntered in with a sigh dodging every strike like it was easy as pie Gizmo tried with a leap to jump on his head Gnar was standing by a tree and looking kinda fed Nibbler toddled in, confusion on his face Skull the Troll aimed to smash his head in with a mace Then Nibbler bared his teeth, they were ready to rend And he gobbled up the group entirely. So satisfied. The...

The Mennonite and the Lurmen Mar26

The Mennonite and the Lurmen...

The episode begins like any other episode thus far in the series. Separatist forces are winning on a particular war front and the Jedi (namely Anakin and Ahsoka) arrive just in time to help turn the tide. Except this time, in Season 1, Episode 14, “Defenders of the Peace,” reactions are different. This time, the Jedi run into the Lurmen and Asoka is baffled by their beliefs. The Lurmen are a neutral race and fervent believers in pacifism. Every situation is so different that you can really only hope to make the best decision at the time. The separatists land, lay claim to the planet, and extend their “protection” (easily understood as oppression) to the villagers. The Lurmen don’t necessarily want this, but they don’t resist. “We will offer no resistance.” – Tee Watt Kaa (village elder) As I watched the episode, I could not help but consider my own background. I went to a Mennonite high school and eventually graduated from a Mennonite university. The beliefs of the Anabaptist movement run deep in my veins. I see similarities between the historical Mennonites and the Lurmen. Given that my last Mennonite history course is more than a decade past, I opted to recruit Conrad Stoesz to watch and discuss this episode with. He is an archivist at the Mennonite Brethren Archives in Winnipeg, MB, and an expert on Mennonite history. I hoped that he would see some link between Mennonite history within this episode, and I was not disappointed. Kyle: Did the episode in any way have some relation to Mennonites, or am I way off? Conrad: No you’re not way off. The struggles between values and practicality. The leader that wanted to stay true to the things that have been done, the way they have...

Characters who should have died but didn’t Mar13

Characters who should have died but didn’t

There will always be characters who just aren’t that interesting but are required to help drive the story along. Then there are the characters who do their best to burn the story to the ground. Here are our ten. 1. Delores Umbridge from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix We’re pretty sure she was more evil than Voldemort. 2. Dawn Summers from Buffy the Vampire Slayer It was always me me me me. Sure fine she was abandoned (in Joss’s words) by “about six parental figures” but whiny is whiny. 3. The entire Lannister line except Tyrion from Song of Ice and Fire ‘Cept we kinda like Jaime too. 4. Harry Kim from Star Trek: Voyager He’s kind of the Dawn Summers of the Star Trek universe. 5. Navi from Ocarina of Time “Hey, listen!” “You’re dead to me.” 6. The dog from Duck Hunt And now in Super Smash Bros. Wii U, he CAN die! 7. Willie Scott from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom This. 8. Slippy from StarFox Really? You’re in trouble AGAIN!? You need my help AGAIN!? How about no? 9. Rose Thomas from Fullmetal Alchemist Dress up in a frog costume and fly a space-ship already. 10. Jar Jar Binks from The Phantom Menace We made him last so you can channel all your hate there. Okay, so who’d we...

Star Wars names left on the drawing board Feb20

Star Wars names left on the drawing board...

What names did George Lucas toss around before coming to the final decision? We dug through a few trash bins and found these. 1. The Centennial Pigeon “Can make the Kestrel Run in less than twelve hundred parsecs.” 2. Luke Moonwalker “The name’s Moonwalker. Luke Moonwalker.” 3. Kleenex Hunter That’s before the deal with Bounty came through. 4. Episode VI: “The Fault in our Death Star” Imperial Officer: We count 30 Rebel ships, Lord Vader, but they’re so small they’re avoiding our turbo lasers! Darth Vader: This time, close the exhaust ports. 5. Death Moon “That’s no moon. Oh, wait…” 6. Princess Freya Think of the cross-overs! 7. Admiral KlondikeBar “I would do anything for you, admiral.” 8. Darth Paul A Sith apprentice who is blinded, sees the error of his ways, and becomes a great Jedi master. Apparently the story has been done before. 9. Lumpawaroo a.k.a. Lumpy Oh… that did make it past the drawing board. 10. Padme Armadillo “I will protect the...

Let’s be bad guys! Or good guys? Feb19

Let’s be bad guys! Or good guys?...

I am a flan. I won’t deny it. And no, that wasn’t a spelling error (“flan” roughly translates into “hardcore Firefly fan,” due to a fortunate slip of the tongue by Nathan Fillion). It was no surprise, therefore, that a few of my “loving” friends recently sent me the Cracked.com video “Firefly Crew Were the Bad Guys.” The video and a variety of discussions on the internet about it, some overly profane and some not, raise a lot of great points to their cause: the Alliance are the good guys. *Collective gasp* Here are the basic points of the argument: Zoe: “Preacher, don’t the Bible have some pretty specific things to say about killin’?” The Alliance creates order throughout the galaxy by establishing space stations, maintaining a military presence and distributing medicine. Those outside of Alliance “control” tend to be quite unsavoury. Mal and Zoe are biased sources, so their perspective of the “evil” Alliance is skewed. The Alliance has established “freedom of religion” and “safe and legal prostitution.” (Personally, I am not sure the latter is a plus, but that’s just me.) The Alliance has created a strong enough economy that a preacher and a companion can afford space-rent. The Alliance’s treatment of River could be seen as acting as the greater good for society. Here’s the problem with the premise of these arguments (and the beauty of Firefly): humanity is far more complex than simple archetypes of good guys and bad guys. The Firefly crew and the Alliance are all bad guys… and good guys. That is what makes Firefly so grand. We see ourselves in these flawed characters, in the good and in the bad. The world of Firefly swims through the fog of moral grey areas with a relatable grace. Book: “Quite specific. It is, however, somewhat...

Fives is not a redshirt Feb18

Fives is not a redshirt...

Every clone’s death is felt. To call them a clone is almost an insult, and that is why I am so impressed with Star Wars: The Clone Wars. I was expecting an exciting and fun show for kids, and while it succeeded at that, the show evolved into so much more. It deals with themes of war, peace, trust, friendship, betrayal, and maintains that every life (clone or otherwise) really matters. Captain Rex, Cody, Waxer, Fives (a.k.a. my favourite), Tup, all of them… I had originally expected they might be treated similar to stormtroopers: available for sacrifice by the truckload, expendable, and replaceable. But this is not the case. “I followed your orders; orders that I didn’t necessarily agreed with. Orders that cost us men, not clones, men!” —Captain Rex Each clone has his own personality and is treated as a unique individual by each other and by the Jedi. They call one another by name rather than their ID numbers, and some troopers are even the focal points of a handful of episodes. All of this is crowned by a single point: EVERY clone’s death is felt. They are not just redshirts. The Jedi conduct funerals when they die; they are mourned. They are missed. Their identical genetic makeup makes no difference. They matter. Ultimately, they are loved. In episodes seven to ten of Season Four, Anakin is called back to Coruscant and has to leave his troopers in the charge of another Jedi, Master Krell. Unlike the way we’ve seen Obi-Wan and Anakin behave towards their clones, Krell treats them like bantha fodder and sends them out on suicide mission after suicide mission. I could just feel Fives’ frustration at being treated like less than a droid and wanting to yell at Krell for not seeing how brilliant...

The key ingredient to incredible friendship Feb17

The key ingredient to incredible friendship

Good stories require good characters. Great stories require great relationships. Take The Lord of the Rings for example. The fate of Middle Earth depends on the characters and their choices, but what do we talk about most after the story is over? The incredible friendships formed in the crucible of the unexpected journey. Frodo and Sam, Legolas and Gimli, Denethor and those cherry tomatoes—all bonds that the audience gets to watch form and strengthen. While every friendship—from our favourite fictional pairings to our own relationships—looks different, true friendships all have something in common. What is this crucial ingredient, you ask? Read on. The Star Wars universe has no shortage of memorable friendships. C-3PO and R2D2 toe the line between best friends and a feuding married couple. Obi-Wan and Anakin behave like bantering brothers. But the one friendship brought up the most is probably between Han and Chewbacca. Some friends fade in and out of your life, others play pivotal roles for season, and a rare few shape you into the person you are. Han and Chewie bring up a popular dynamic used in the Star Wars canon—the life debt. Chewbacca is a Wookie from the planet Kashyyyk and their culture is built upon a strong reliance on honour. If someone saves a Wookie’s life, that Wookie is honour-bound to pledge their life in service to their saviour. Wookies take this vow incredibly seriously, and to disregard a life debt is to disregard their entire culture. Han was an imperial pilot when he met Chewie, and refused an order from his commander to kill him, later rescuing the Wookie from slavery and sacrificing his career in the military. Chewbacca then becomes Han’s co-pilot and owes him a life debt. But it’s clear that they’ve become something more than obligated partners in a business transaction—they’ve become best friends. They’ve put their lives on the line for one another countless times, forming a bond that runs deeper than any Wookie law. Not every fictional universe has a carefully thought out mythology to a life debt, but this same type of bond between friends exists everywhere. John Watson doesn’t owe Sherlock Holmes his life out of some religious sense of honour, but he still follows the detective into any situation without hesitation, usually at his own peril. Pumba doesn’t save Timon from a rampaging hippopotamus (well, not that we know of), but the inseparable pals still have each other’s backs through lion attacks and rounds of Hakuna Matata. We know true friendships aren’t just about the good times. Malcolm Reynolds, captain of Serenity, doesn’t make friends easily, but when someone earns his trust, it runs deep. When he and Wash are held hostage and tortured, Mal starts to list all sorts of things that he would do with Wash’s wife if they get out alive. Understandably, this gets Wash pretty worked up. We learn later that Mal was keeping Wash conscious by keeping his mind off the excruciating pain. Best friends aren’t just there for the sarcastic banter or the musical number; they’re there for when you’re strung up and electrocuted too. Sometimes a real best friend has to be the “bad guy” and tell someone something they don’t want to hear. How many times did Hermione pull Harry’s and Ron’s butts out of the fire? If not for her obsessive desire for magical knowledge, her wisdom and forethought, the boy who lived would have been killed more than once in the first book alone. Sometimes a real best friend has to be the “bad guy” and tell someone something they don’t want to hear. Hermione not only shows what an awesome friend she is by forcing important but uncomfortable conversations and knowing when to shout, “I’m not an owl!” to inform Harry that he should get over petty squabbles, she gives up everything to help Harry stop Voldemort. Remember that time that...

Opening a geek (not greek) pizza shop… Feb13

Opening a geek (not greek) pizza shop…...

The best pizza shops name their pizzas so we decided to give it a go. Not that we have any intention of ever opening up a pizza shop.. or do we? So what did we miss? Any further suggestions?

Doctor Who is my saviour Feb10

Doctor Who is my saviour...

Personally, I miss the days of Battlestar Galactica’s supremacy on TV, but I cannot deny that allure and magic of Doctor Who. Either way, it was my love for Science-Fiction and linking it to things deeper than “who is the best doctor?” that caught the attention of an Anglican mission in Winnipeg, St. Benedict’s Table. Geekdom House was asked to come kick-off their relaunch of ideaExchange. As the title would suggest, ideaExchange is an exchange of faith-based ideas not typically addressed from a pulpit on a Sunday morning. After meeting with Jamie Howison, a priest at St. Benedict’s Table, we came up with the idea to watch, study, and discuss the episode “Vincent and the Doctor.” The episode stars the eleventh (and my favourite because of this episode) doctor, Matt Smith. However, due to technical difficulties the episode could not be played on the night in question, and instead what happened was a semi-improvised discussion about geek culture, community, faith, and why Star Wars episodes 1,2, and 3 were comparable to poorly made Christian films (of which there are a number of examples). Here is the podcast in its entirety, and if you’re interested in listening to more ideaExchange talks, you’re more than welcome to check out the St. Benedict’s Table podcast on...

Unlikely Friendships that Should Have Been Feb05

Unlikely Friendships that Should Have Been

We all know (and love) the many friendships that are exhibited within a variety of shows: Han and Chewy, Frodo and Sam, Mega Man and Rocket, Blanka and your face, you get the idea. But sometimes those friendships are just not enough and we need to reach outside their respective genres for the friendship matches made in heaven. Here are our top 10: Calvin & Chewbacca “You know, Chewy, some days even my lucky Millenium Falcon underpants don’t help.” Hermione Granger & Twilight Sparkle They’ll form a group called S.B.E.W. (Society for the Bookworms of Equestria and the World). Edward Elric & Gimli Sometimes dynamite comes in small packages and can explode at anytime, especially if you mention anything about being short. Tony Stark & Tali-Zorah “Testing rocket boots, Day 11, Test 37, Configuration 2.0. For lack of a better option, Tali is still on fire safety.” Arya Stark & Toph Beifong We just want to see these two take on an army together. Master Chief (John-117) & John the Baptist “But after me comes one who is more powerful than I, one who wears the spartan helmet of salvation and wields the energy sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.” Sephiroth and Scar Scar would get some much needed perspective—“You wanna be king of a rock? Well I wanna destroy the world with a giant meteor”—and Sephiroth can stop being jealous that he doesn’t have a pet lion like the other side. Mal Reynolds & Doctor Horrible So Doctor Horrible can’t be friends with Captain Hammer, but he can darn sure be friends with Captain Tightpants! Caprica Six & Seven of Nine Separated from the hive collective with a strong desire to gain some form of humanity. It’s kind of true for both. Although Seven of Nine definitely has better taste in men. Jayne Cobb & John Casey “Do you know what the chain of command is? It’s the chain I go and get to beat you with until you buy this washing machine.” Certainly we missed a bunch. Which unlikely friendships would you...