Loving the wolves and buggers Nov20

Loving the wolves and buggers...

War. The word drenches up images of carnage, of good guys and bad guys, of friends and foes. The definitions differ depending on which side is telling the story. We are always the good guys of course. The other side is the enemy. We must hate the enemy, for if we are the good guys, that makes the enemy evil. In our world today, if I were to simply go by the media’s reports, I would conclude that there are enemies around every corner. A disgruntled teenager, a particular people group, a certain political party, zombies. Well, maybe not that last one. I can see that wars are going on everywhere. Refugees are fleeing by the millions from places like Syria and finding the doors of their countries of hope slamming shut in their faces. So it seems to me that this idea of figuring out who is the good guy and who is the bad guy is pretty important. Who is the enemy? Someone who looks a little different? Someone who doesn’t believe the same things I do? Why are we so afraid of the different? Why do we make what is different into the enemy?Perhaps foes can live side by side and even become friends. In Orson Scott Card’s book Ender’s Game, Ender is taught to hate the Buggers (the alien race that invaded Earth). Despite the prevailing mindset of pretty much every other human being Ender knows, he finds himself drawn to understand this alien race and, in doing so, learns to love them. It is this love that ultimately gives him the understanding of how they live and operate, and that allows him to destroy them. It is also this love that drives him to write a book that helps...