Our favourite comedy TV shows Jul17

Our favourite comedy TV shows...

Geeks are no longer stereotyped as socially-inept computer whizzes with allergies and glasses, but have taken over the silver screen as intelligent nerds with a vision. While we might still laugh at Moss for blurting out whatever he’s thinking or Chuck for being nervous around Sarah, we more often laugh with them than at them. These shows are some of the geekiest and funniest we’ve ever seen. 1. The IT Crowd Roy: Hello, IT. Have you tried turning it off and on again? Uh… okay, well, the button on the side, is it glowing? Yeah, you need to turn it on… uh, the button turns it on… yeah, you do know how a button works don’t you? No, not on clothes. A show about tech support, the most indispensable of geeks. It’s dry wit is why we love it. 2. Community Jeff: For your information, I don’t have an ego. My Facebook photo is a landscape. Maybe not branded as a “geek” show, but they do their references right. The paintball and D&D episodes are our favourites. 3. Chuck Lester: You’re out-gunned, out-manned, out…side, and it’s a lovely day, so throw down your gun and nobody gets hurt. It’s got action, romance, spies, drama, crime, wit, and a dash of nerdiness. It’s pretty much the perfect show. 4. The Big Bang Theory Sheldon: Interesting. You’re afraid of insects and women. Ladybugs must render you catatonic. Lots of geeks don’t like The Big Bang Theory because it seems to be made more for people like Penny rather than for people like Leonard or Sheldon, but some of us find it amusing nonetheless. 5. The Guild Codex: So, it’s uh Friday night and… still jobless, yay. I haven’t left the house in a week. My therapist uh, broke up with...

Guild Wars is my sandwich...

In my journeys across the great, expansive world of the Internet, I have come to learn that community is ultimately what makes or breaks an online environment, whether it be in the context of an online game, a forum, or even an entire fandom. I’m a sucker for lame metaphors, and I’ve concocted a doozie to apply to such an examination as this; the online environment itself can be represented by a tasty sandwich, with its community represented as the cheese. Let me first offer an example centred on one of my all-time favourite online roleplaying games: Guild Wars 2. As a sandwich, I see this game as a big tasty reuben (Arguably my favourite sandwich! But not everyone likes them, so if you’re one of those people, just try to see things from my point of view for the sake of this little metaphor). It is a breathtaking beauty to behold, incomparably delectable, highly and unhealthily addictive, and undeniably one of humanity’s finest creations. The cheese is perfectly melted into the sandwich, in such a way that the two are indistinguishably unified and interpreted by the taste buds as one single delicious entity. I prefer communities where we can all move toward our collective betterment together. Now let’s turn things around and talk about the other side of the proverbial pancake. I cannot discuss online game communities without mentioning League of Legends, a game notorious for its unwelcoming, quick-to-anger community of players. And this, more than any other aspect, heavily detracts from new players’ enjoyment of the game. I mean, it really seems like an otherwise great game; I was a big fan of the DotA mod in Warcraft 3, and the similarities between the two are undeniable. I see League of Legends...

Bombs away, League

Hurling bombs is no way to win parents to your side. That’s what I feel in response to “Open Letter to Parents of League of Legends Players,” posted on the LoL forums. Look, I get it. I hate it when players quit early regardless of the reason, regardless of the game. There are few things more frustrating when you’re pushing your lane than the support disappearing like bacon for breakfast. But I have to ask, what is your end game? Do you really want to reach out to parents and have them acquiesce to your request and preserve the integrity of the game, or do you simply want to rally the chorus of players that already agrees with you? The way I read it, as both a gamer and a parent, I feel like it was the latter and the former was completely missed. If your child plays League of Legends, would it be possible to talk to them about when it is appropriate to start a match and when it is not? The points made are solid: Teaching kids responsibility for their actions, honouring their commitments, and recognizing that there are real people on the other end of the matrix. It is easy to see why Kotaku called the lessons “sensible,” and if you can get to the heart of the concern, I’d agree. But this letter is not going to accomplish what you’ve set out to do. There’s a reason why Gabe from Penny Arcade responded the way he did (with a rage that burns like a thousand suns). Suggesting that Gabe simply missed the point and dismissing his argument entirely with, “I was disappointed that they got it wrong, but oh well,” suggests that perhaps you are the one who missed...

The prodigal geek Mar04

The prodigal geek

I‘ve heard the parable of the prodigal son a thousand times. At church, at youth conferences, at Bible studies, the tale of a young man who leaves home and deals with the consequences has been firmly entrenched within me. The prodigal son strikes out to the big city and encounters a harsh reality. He ends up broken, sleeping with the pigs. After a time, he swallows his pride and returns home to find his father weeping for joy at the return of the son he thought lost. It’s a great story about humility and unconditional love. And I never liked it. I always related more to the prodigal son’s brother, the guy who stuck at home the whole time. The guy who was reliable and trustworthy. The guy who never got this kind of party. He comes in from working the fields to find the farm bustling with excitement over the news of his brother’s return. He’s angry because he stayed and worked this whole time and was never celebrated in such a way. I want to share my love with the world without being afraid that the world won’t love me back. I think my identity as a geek has turned me into the prodigal sibling. Growing up, being called a geek was a cruel insult, venom in the mouth of those who deemed your interests too far outside the convention of normalcy. If you were a geek, you were bullied and had few friends. At the time, I wanted more people to like the same things I liked. If the things I liked were cool, then I would be cool too. It all seemed so simple. But then, as I got older, something strange started to happen. Everyone had cellphones and laptops;...

The Heart Behind Geekdom House Feb01

The Heart Behind Geekdom House

The primary operating belief behind Geekdom House is that both the Christian community and the nerd and geek community have something to offer one another. We are not trying to Christian-ify the nerd and geek community, but our philosophy is about creating a space where both groups can interact with each other. We want to be honest about our love for all things nerd and geek related and not be afraid to engage with it on a philosophical, spiritual, and faith-based level. We want both communities to have a positive impact on each other. “We believe that being righteous is far more valuable than arrogantly being right.” We truly believe that there are those within both communities that love to engage in rich discussions about the metaphysical. We believe this because for years many of us have found ourselves with feet in both camps. Area of Effect, as a publication, is meant to be a place where we band together in our love for all things nerd and geek related, and we hope to inspire moral, ethical, and metaphysical discussion. We are honest that our bias is rooted within Christianity, but we humbly believe that we, too, are mere Padawans on our journeys. As an organization we do not have a unified theology, and each staff/writer/minion has their own interpretations and understandings. We do have though the expectation that none of us truly believe we have it all figured out. We believe that being righteous is far more valuable than arrogantly being right. We are open to discussion, open to being wrong, and open to learning more from anyone about who we are, why we are here, and what our purpose is. We hope that, as Christians, by making an honest and earnest creative contribution to the community, others (regardless of their faith background) will accept our invitation to have discussions about these things in the nerd and geek community that we all love so dearly. We love having these discussions and we hate having to leave our faith at the door. We want to bring ours and let you bring yours while we figure this all out together. Let the discussions...