Gift Guide to Geek Art Nov04

Gift Guide to Geek Art...

Like winter, Christmas is coming. And if you know anything about geeks, it’s that we love fan art. Since art is a big part of what we do here at Geekdom House, we’ve got the inside scoop on where you can go for your art lover’s Christmas gifts this year, including a list of some of the fandoms they cover so you can search this post for anything particular you’re looking for. That’s right, we did all the work for you. Or, of course, you could send your friends this link so they know what to get you. That works, too. 1. Paper Beats Rock Super Smash Bros. • Mario • Pokemon • Avatar: The Last Airbender • Spiderman • Venom • Attack on Titan • Big Hero 6 • Spirited Away • Gundam • Street Fighter • The Legend of Zelda • Link • Samus • Megaman • Fairy Tail • Natsu • Fullmetal Alchemist • Deadpool • The Flash • DragonballZ 2. Fabled Creative Pokemon • Jurassic Park • Retro • Space • BioShock • Supernatural • Mario • Batman • Fallout • Portal • Destiny • Luigi • Daisy • Mario Kart • Wario • Toad • Bowser • Maps   3. Otis Frampton Star Wars • Firefly • The Lord of the Rings • The Hobbit • My Neighbor Totoro • Doctor Who • Mad Max • The Legend of Zelda • Star Trek • The Big Bang Theory   4. Joe Hogan Art Pokemon • The Legend of Zelda • Majora’s Mask • Adventure Time • Mad Max • Final Fantasy • Cloud • Mario • Megaman • Spider-Man • Star Wars • Banjo-Kazooie • Stranger Things • Super Smash Bros. • Link • Peach • The Wind Waker • Rick and Morty • Ghostbusters • Sonic the Hedgehog • Journey • Mass Effect • Undertale • Halo   5. Sandara Fantasy • Dragons • Dungeons & Dragons • Myths   6. Wisesnail Art Sherlock • Deadpool • Guardians of the Galaxy • Rocket Raccoon • The Avengers • Harley Quinn • Suicide Squad • The Joker • Moriarty • The Falcon • Captain America • The Lord of the Rings • Vision • Groot • Assassin’s Creed • Doctor Strange •...

Artist Spotlight and Giveaway: Joe Hogan Art Aug18

Artist Spotlight and Giveaway: Joe Hogan Art...

“My favourite moment as a fan that came about because of my art was when James Arnold Taylor (the voice of Obi-Wan Kenobi on The Clone Wars) agreed to lend his amazing talents to an unofficial Clone Wars motion comic I was creating called ‘The Siren of Dathomir’.” Working with people like James is one of the reasons Joe Hogan loves being an artist. He also loves bringing his fandoms to life through his art. “Art is my way of expressing who I am, what I love, what I care about,” Joe says. “Any time I’m really excited about something that I can’t quite get out of my system, or something is bothering me, or whatever, I can just sit down and put in on paper (or a digital screen!) and now it’s in the universe and not just inside me any more. There’s something very liberating about that.” Joe has done professional work for Topps, Upper Deck, Cryptozoic, and other companies. He’s dabbled in some of the most exciting franchises, including Star Wars, the Marvel universe, Batman, The Legend of Zelda, and more. He loves being a Star Wars and geek artist because he gets to make things he would want to see as a fan. “When you’re a kid, your imagination is all over the place and I used to express it with action figures. I never quite grew out of an active imagination, so drawing those new stories in comics/motion comics/etc. replaced the toys. And okay, yes, the toys are still on my shelves. Don’t judge me! Growing up is overrated anyway.” Check out samples of his work: Pokemon! Massively Effective The Twelve Smashers Pass the Torch Blue vs. Red The Promise – Final Fantasy VII Undertale Link Nouveau In addition to...

Artist Spotlight and Giveaway: Wisesnail Art Jul14

Artist Spotlight and Giveaway: Wisesnail Art...

Claudia Gironi, a.k.a. Wisesnail Art, is one of our extremely talented Area of Effect magazine cover artists and web art contributors. A huge fan of atmospheric landscapes, portraits, and colour explosions, she mainly works in Photoshop, combining the versatility of the digital approach to the expressive brushstrokes of a more traditional method. “Art is how I express myself. It’s what I do when I’m upset, when I’m happy, if I need a distraction, or if I want to concentrate on something,” says Claudia. “As a person with face blindness (meaning I have problems recognizing people’s faces), I feel like I have a small measure of control when I paint portraits.” Born in Italy, Claudia currently lives in London. She is a Japanese Language and Culture graduate, Schiele enthusiast, and art lover. She decided to teach herself digital painting four years ago—since then she has never abandoned her stylus. Check out samples of her work: Altair I am Groot! The Man of Iron Sherlock The Dark Lord Thor Thranduil Oropherion Bucky As a geek herself, Claudia enjoys drawing subjects from science fiction, fantasy, and comics. She says that The Lord of the Rings is one of her favourite fandoms and she greatly admires J.R.R. Tolkien; The Silmarillion especially provides her with inspiration. “I like the fact that I have more room to play with the characters themselves, especially if they don’t appear in the movies. Also, the other fans are really super nice, and welcome all new takes on the characters they love.” Claudia sings out loud while she paints (embarrassing herself in front of the whole neighbourhood if it’s summer and the windows are open), likes dogs, enjoys baking, and is always happy to talk about art and fandoms with other people. You can find her art on her Society 6 page and...

Art as a Spiritual Power-Up May06

Art as a Spiritual Power-Up...

When I write something without holding anything back, when I wear my words on my sleeve, they hold the realest power. But that also means sporting a bull’s eye for the arrows of criticism and objectification. This is the life of an artist, knowing that putting your work out there means it can be admired or rejected. Maybe I fear others’ evaluations and criticisms of my work a bit too much. I hear a lot of well-meaning “writing advice” meant to keep the metaphorical stomach butterflies at bay, but perhaps the most-recited quip is: “Separate yourself from your work.” I get it. I shouldn’t put my self-worth into something outside of myself. That’s a one-way trip to unattainable perfectionism. Still, I don’t think the line is so clearly drawn between “self” and “art” that I can easily step across it and be protected from all criticism by some magical force-field. My words are an extension of myself. I breathe them to life, ex nihilo-style, and then decide to call them “good.” (After several re-writes, anyway.) Obviously the inky jots on the page come from my experiences, my personality, my nostalgia, my knowledge. Psychologically, I am one with my words, no matter how much I try to convince myself, for my sanity’s sake, that we are separate entities. In terms of artistic passion, where does self end and society begin? Is the true value of art found in creating it or in sharing it? Is the true value of art found in creating it or in sharing it? I didn’t expect to find so many answers in a competitive-swimming anime called Free! Eternal Summer. I hastily judged it as a mix of bromance, muscles, and melodrama, with a protagonist so obsessed with H2O that he’d...

A theology of Christian geekdom Sep11

A theology of Christian geekdom...

Geek (gēk): A person who is very interested in and knows a lot about a particular field or activity; a person who is socially awkward and unpopular; a usually intelligent person who does not fit in with other people. Christian (krĭs′chən): A person who believes in and follows Jesus Christ. ____ North American Evangelicalism doesn’t have the best track record of embracing the arts. From Puritan iconoclasts to 20th-century fundamentalists, the arts and artists were historically pigeonholed with the worst sectors of high church legalism. More recently, the arts have been associated with dangerous flirtations with worldly culture manifested in film, television, comics, and video games. Some even go so far as to suggest that Christians who engage with the geek arts shame God and open themselves to demonic attack. While it is entirely possible for people to be “geeky” about sports or the hard sciences, there is a subset of geekdom that focuses primarily on the arts. Books? Television? Movies? Video Games? Anime? These are storytelling arts. Art (ahrt): Something that is created with imagination and skill and that is beautiful or that expresses important ideas or feelings. Certain geeks—say, the people who regularly read this site—are actually art lovers. That’s right, kiss the cheese doodle dust off your fingers and give me a high-five, because I’m looking at you! In some ways, Evangelicalism’s rejection of the arts has often implied a rejection of geeks. Those of us who love video games, movies, comics, fantasy stories, and all the rest have felt misunderstood, belittled, or in the worst cases, outright rejected by our families and church communities for frittering away our time and energy on these pursuits. In his critically-acclaimed autobiographical graphic novel Blankets, author Craig Thompson includes these frames that characterize the...