Monopolizing My Integrity Dec18

Monopolizing My Integrity...

It’s not often that you see a boot, a dog, a thimble, and a battleship compete for economic domination. Nor is a car crushing the hopes and dreams of a down-on-its-luck wheelbarrow as it demands $2000 for staying at the luxurious Boardwalk hotel for the night a common occurrence. Unless we’re talking about Monopoly, of course. Monopoly may be the single greatest board game out there. Here’s why: its gameplay is simple enough to be understood by children, it teaches basic economics (it’s fun and educational!), and while luck plays into it, it’s a largely strategic game. Will you wheel and deal your way to victory? Or will you crumble under the pressure, hoping to be sent to jail so you can avoid another rent payment? However, house rules generally allow for a different way to avoid paying rent, and here’s how: We very easily allow ourselves to suspend our own integrity when it benefits us. You rolled a seven; you knew if you were going to survive another round you needed an eight. But rather than landing neatly on ‘Free Parking’—which would have scored you a sweet $735—you’ve landed on New York Avenue, which incidentally has a hotel on it. You know you don’t have the $1000 to pay rent, but look! The owner is checking their phone! You quickly pass the dice to the next player, abruptly ending your turn, saving yourself from bankruptcy. Here’s what the game manual says, with our house rule added in brackets: “When you land on a property that is owned by another player (and that player notices), the owner collects rent from you in accordance with the list printed on its Title Deed card.” The same house rule can be applied to Settlers of Catan, where players...