Episode 82 – FanQuest (feat. D.C. Douglas) May30

Episode 82 – FanQuest (feat. D.C. Douglas)...

The only podcast recording this episode live from FanQuest, it’s Infinity +1! This week is a special episode recorded right from out booth at FanQuest here in Winnipeg. Jason, Kyle, and friend of the show Dustin Schellenberg unite to talk about their favourite moments of the convention and share their favourite Star Wars moments in honour of the 40th anniversary of the legendary franchise. Then, in a very special second segment, Jason was joined by FanQuest guest and voice actor extraordinaire, D.C. Douglas for a conversation about the world of voice acting and some personal history about D.C.’s time in the industry. Question of the Week: What is your favourite Star Wars moment? Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast D.C. Douglas’ Twitter: @DC_Douglas Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Dustin’s Twitter: @PDschellenberg Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Where the Sea Meets the Land: Ego the Living Planet, Iron Man, and the Power of Relationship May29

Where the Sea Meets the Land: Ego the Living Planet, Iron Man, and the Power of Relationship...

Brandy, you’re a fine girl, What a good wife you would be But my life, my lover, my lady is the sea. “We’re the sailor in that song,” Ego tells Peter in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. “There are fine girls out there, but they aren’t for us. We’re made for bigger things.” And by “bigger things,” Ego meant taking over the universe. When Ego first discovered life elsewhere in the universe, it disappointed him. It wasn’t as powerful, as strong, or as perfect as he was. So he began a plan to terraform (Egoform?) every planet, replacing all known life with himself. Nothing else, not even the love of an earth-born River Lily, was worth putting aside this meaning Ego had found for his life. This plan of expansion was Ego’s sea—his life and his love. Nothing on shore could compare to it, and to him, it was worth destroying the distraction Meredith Quill posed to him. Ego’s story reminds me of another sailor in the Marvel universe—Tony Stark. Being Iron Man is Tony’s life, his sea. Building the suits and coming up with better ways to protect the world have become so much a part of who he is that he can’t stop, can’t slow down, not even for Pepper. At the end of Iron Man 3, Tony blows up the Iron Legion, effectively promising Pepper that she’s his priority, and that he’ll do better for her. But by The Avengers: Age of Ultron he’s already in over his head trying to save the world, and by Captain America: Civil War, he’s spent so much time on the sea, there’s no one left for him on land. I can understand where both Ego and Tony come from. Though I’m not all-powerful or a genius, I have a bit of the sailor in myself as well. As a creative from birth, when I don’t get the time to work on any of my many projects, I end up feeling purposeless, like a sailor on land. I miss my sea of hobbies, and sometimes it does seems like the people on land are distractions. And sometimes, even though I want to focus on the people around me, I am drawn back into my projects, ignoring the people I love even while I’m with them. But what happens when I get so lost in my accomplishments and in the purpose I’ve created for myself? What happens when I reach my goal and then move on to the next, and then the next, and then the next, because I need that purpose to survive? What happens after Ego conquers the universe, after every planet is part of him? His purpose, the meaning he’d created for his life, would be accomplished, and he would be alone forever—and for real this time. What happens if Tony devotes his entire life to creating inventions that protect the world? He won’t be able to protect mankind from itself, and will inevitably run himself to the ground trying to. What happens when I focus all my time and effort on making, building, creating? The frustrations I encounter while designing will build up, and begin to outweigh the joy I find in creating, especially as the things I create continually fail to match the perfect expectations I hold in my head. The sea is beautiful, and there is nothing wrong with loving it. Having a purpose, finding meaning for your life, is essential. But when you lose the context of relationship, and set sail never to return to land, it’s easy for the meaning to warp and mutate into something far less beautiful. Ego found life that existed outside of himself, and was disappointed by it. But rather than using his power for the benefit of others, he decided that greatness lay in replacement rather than cooperation. Had he gone back to Meredith, he might have...

The Mothers Grimm May26

The Mothers Grimm

I have heard it said many times that, until you become a mother, you can’t imagine the love that you are capable of for your child. Sure, you love your spouse a ton—obviously enough to decide to spend the rest of your lives together, but the love a mother has for her child is fierce. Fierce because of the intensity, fierce because it changes who you are and the way you experience the world, and fierce because you would do anything to protect that little thing even if you had to face the very gates of hell to do it. And speaking of the very gates of hell… the TV series, Grimm, just had its finale a few weeks ago. True to what the name suggests, the show’s faerie tales are dark, gruesome, and highly entertaining. The premise of Grimm is that the creatures from the faerie stories we all love are real—and they live among us. We’re talking werewolves, talking foxes, mice, lizard creatures, the Krampus—all manner of “monsters.” They’re called Wesen. Most of the time, they look like us, but when they become frightened, or angry, or want to be in their natural element they “woge,” and take on their animalistic appearance. The Grimm family has, for centuries, been hunting, killing and recording the stories of these creatures. From the moment pregnancy takes hold, our bodies become something of a living sacrifice. The finale revolves around a Portland police detective named Nick Burkhardt and he only discovered that he was a Grimm in his adulthood. It had been hidden from him for his own protection. Unlike many others, Nick’s more open to judging Wesen by their actions rather than by their genetics. He befriends several Wesen, and seeks justice for and protects good ones....

Alien: Covenant and the Significance of Sacrificial Love May24

Alien: Covenant and the Significance of Sacrificial Love...

The Alien films are all about the coldness of space with an emphasis on mechanics ahead of humans, the quietness in the vastness of the universe, and the xenomorphs that hunt humans without relent. So it feels strange, at first, that in Alien: Covenant the vessel is led by a crew consisting largely of married couples, carrying in the warmth of love to this callous environment. Unlike in many horror films, the couples don’t turn on each other. Their love is real and deep; they are strong, solid, and supportive. It’s no wonder these pairs were specifically selected for the Covenant’s colonization mission, as they have the responsibility of guiding a ship carrying thousands of humans and additional embryos to a new planet. The crew is also friendly, and despite arguments and missteps, genuinely want the best for one another. And yet, despite its promising beginning, lots of people die. The crew of the Covenant fights against the furious predators, the coldness of space, and evils of sin and humanity. This is no touchy-feely universe. Love doesn’t stand a chance. Living a life separated in every way from the frightening fiction of the Aliens franchise, I’m much more optimistic about love. I believe that my friends will reach out to me when I’m hurting. I believe that I’ll be gracious to those who injure me. I believe that my church community will love the downtrodden and the cast aside. Many times, my expectations are met; but more than I’d like to admit to myself, they are not. It doesn’t take a monster to destroy love; humans can do that just fine on their own. In the midst of Alien: Covenant’s chaotic action, the film manages to stress that dilemma. Battles take place within the...

Episode 81 – Come and Get Your Love May23

Episode 81 – Come and Get Your Love...

The podcast who knew what was in the Lost hatch all along, it’s Infinity +1! This week Jason, Allison, and Kyle relive the most impactful deaths in their video game history in the Question of the Week and Allison awards May’s edition of the Sweetdiculous Award to a podcast for writing nerds. Then in the second segment, we revisit Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 through the eyes of Rocket Raccoon with the help of Come and Get Your Love by Allison Barron. If you want to hear what Allison and Rocket have in common beside a love for destruction and sarcasm, you’ll have to listen on! Question of the Week: What video game character do you most regret killing? Sweetdiculous Award: Writing Excuses The song in the break is It’s Not Old Skool It’s Classic by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @AllisonBarron12 Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Why Superman Never Gets his Deepest Wish May22

Why Superman Never Gets his Deepest Wish...

What would you do in a world where all your dreams came true? In the 1985 Superman story, “For the Man Who Has Everything,” Alan Moore (legendary author of Watchmen, V for Vendetta, etc.) asks just that. The tale begins at Superman’s Fortress of Solitude, where Batman, Robin, and Wonder Woman arrive to celebrate Superman’s birthday. As they walk through the Fortress’s entrance, Batman comments on how hard it is getting Superman good gifts. He then shows Wonder Woman his present, a one-of-a-kind rose, called the Krypton, that he hired an expert to breed. “I’m pretty certain no one else will have got him flowers,” Batman jokes. “Uh, Bruce,” Robin says, looking ahead at something outside the comic book panel. “Maybe it’s not too late to change it for something else.” Batman and Wonder Woman stop, seeing Superman standing in the next room, still as a statue with eyes wide open. We can’t even tell if he’s breathing. A gift-wrapped box lies open at Superman’s feet and an alien plant is latched onto his chest. Someone has found a way to neutralize the Man of Steel. Perhaps the traumatic times in life are more than just moments of pain. The heroes haven’t spent much time examining Superman before Mongul, a big yellow alien with Bond-villain arrogance, appears. He explains the alien plant is called the Black Mercy and gives victims visions of their deepest desires. Victims can release it, but don’t want to. It’s tempting to consider what my life would be like without past struggles. My life took a difficult turn when I was 11 years old and my family moved back to America after eight years overseas. Being a socially awkward kid who hated change, I didn’t have an easy time adjusting...

Come and Get Your Love May19

Come and Get Your Love...

There is no bigger jerk in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 than the loud-mouthed, quick-to-anger, genetically-modified and mechanically-inclined Rocket Raccoon. He steals from the Guardians’ clients, making enemies where they could have had allies; he pushes his friends away when they try to talk to him; he retreats into loneliness against all common sense. “Are you trying to make everyone hate you? Because you’re doing it perfectly,” Peter Quill says to him. And Quill’s right—Rocket seems to be doing everything to reject the ragtag family he’s become a part of, a family who accepts him for who he is. Why? Why would someone throw away love and companionship when it’s offered to them? The answer resonates with me deeply—it’s fear. Rocket is the only one of his kind and his life has been filled with loneliness as a result. He’s gotten used to fending for himself. He’s become accustomed to the isolation. Now suddenly he is surrounded by people who care about him and the fear sets in; the fear that they will change their minds and reject him, the fear that he’s not worth being accepted for who he is. This kind of anxiety can overwhelm all logic. His actions—his seeming desire to make every situation worse and get under his companions’ skin—don’t make sense. But the fear is strong with this one. It drives him to extremely illogical decisions. It takes two to tango. Though irrational, I understand Rocket’s feelings perfectly. The very beginning of a new relationship, either romantic or platonic, is new and exciting. It’s fun getting to know the other person and surprising them with your own quirks and personality. It’s when a few weeks or months have passed—when the relationship is formed but still growing—that I start...

All Who Wander: The Return of the King Book 2 May18

All Who Wander: The Return of the King Book 2...

Mae govannen, fellow wanderers, and welcome to episode eight of All Who Wander, the in-depth audio exploration of one of J. R. R. Tolkien’s most famous works, The Lord of the Rings. In this penultimate episode, Allison and Kyla are joined for a final time by the mayor of Hobbiton himself, Michael Boyce, to talk about the end of the Third Age of Middle-earth and the many exciting endings of The Return of the King. Why is it important to examine topics like diversity in works like this? What is the role of the true king of Gondor? Will Sharkey ever get his groove back? Download and subscribe to the Infinity +1 feed on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Allison’s Twitter: @AllisonBarron12 Kyla’s Twitter: @rlandnews Michael’s Twitter: @mwboyce Geekdom House on Twitter:...

True Villainy in Once Upon a Time: Captain Hook vs. Rumpelstiltskin May17

True Villainy in Once Upon a Time: Captain Hook vs. Rumpelstiltskin...

Of all the fights, feuds, and fisticuffs in ABC’s hit show Once Upon a Time, the private war between Captain Hook and Rumpelstiltskin is the stuff of vengeance legend—and just as remarkable as their quest to destroy one another is the blame-game they play while doing it. Their troubles begin in the Enchanted Forest, when Rumpelstiltskin is no more than the crippled village coward. When the dashing pirate, Killian Jones—later known as Captain Hook—passes through town, he takes Rumple’s wife, Milah, away to his ship. Desperate to retrieve Milah for their son’s sake, Rumple limps his way to Killian’s ship to beg for her return. Killian agrees—if Rumple can best him in a duel. Rumple, unable to handle a sword or even walk unaided, is forced to return home without his wife. Years later, Rumple gets the chance to face his enemy again, this time with the deck stacked in his favour. During those years, Rumpelstiltskin became the Dark One, an incredibly powerful sorcerer. He originally sought the dark magic to protect his son, but over time he became obsessed with his own power. After all those years of being called a weakling, he loves feeling unstoppable. I have been blessed with plenty of my own talents, but physical strength is not one of them. The thought of being able to defend myself when I feel wronged is alluring. Rumple thought his dark power would defend him and his son, but it became a disguise for his cowardice, a mask that made him a worse monster than those he fought. Sometimes, I let pain turn me into a villain, and I hurt the people around me. Had Rumple been truly brave, he would have let Killian go when he encountered him again. Instead, he...

Episode 80 – Community Origins May16

Episode 80 – Community Origins...

The podcast whose idea of formal wear is a Donkey Kong tie, it’s Infinity +1! This week Jason, Allison, and Kyle celebrate some of their favourite fictional mothers in the Question of the Week, then load up some Saved Files from the last few weeks, including a very special presentation by our very own Incantatem. Then in the second segment, Attack on Titan‘s Sasha Braus has to learn how to accept her past while not being defined by it. Our hosts look at Attack on Titan Reminds us to Value our Origins by Victoria Grace Howell as a an origin point for a discussion about small towns and their own communities and accepting when the loudest voices aren’t representative of the whole. Question of the Week: Who’s your favourite fictional mother? The song in the break is It’s Not A Keygen by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @AllisonBarron12 Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from Teepublic Oath for Termina by...

Wolf Children and a Mother’s Sacrifice May15

Wolf Children and a Mother’s Sacrifice...

Hana from Wolf Children is the ultimate mother. After unexpectedly becoming a single parent, she gives up everything to take care of her two babies, Ame and Yuki. She gives up university, living in the convenience of the city, and the entire direction of her life to ensure that her children grow up healthy and happy. Her sacrifice and perseverance touches me deeply and I can’t help being reminded of my own mother. My mom took care of my sister and me while she was in an unhappy marriage so we could grow up with a father in our lives. To me, that sacrifice is as big as raising us as a single mom. She chose to live unhappily so her children could live happily. When Ame and Yuki were babies, Hana barely had time to sleep or eat or do anything for herself while she took care of them. She too lived unhappily for a time for the sake of her children. To give us more freedom in our education, my mom homeschooled us. Much of the research she did herself to provide the best education she could while also letting us grow up with plenty of extracurricular activities and time for fun. Similarly (somewhat), Hana researched everything she could to ensure she could raise Ame and Yuki as both humans and wolves. She wanted to give them the freedom to choose which path they wanted. Both of these mothers gave their children the freedom to choose their future paths and did so without judgement. When my sister and I grew into our teenage years, our relationship with our dad became strained to the point my mom felt like we should leave him. In a matter of days, she packed up everything and moved...

The Forgotten Mothers of Star Wars May12

The Forgotten Mothers of Star Wars...

As origin stories go, the Skywalker twins have it fairly rough: they were orphaned not once, but twice. I don’t know much about the Organa and Lars families, but when I watch Luke and Leia, it’s clear they’ve been taught good values, and I wonder how much their mothers had to do with it. “My wife and I will take the girl. We’ve always talked of adopting a baby girl. She will be loved with us.” —Bail Organa, Revenge of the Sith Breha Organa, the queen of Alderaan and Senator Bail Organa’s wife, appears for a few seconds in the closing montage of Revenge of the Sith. The music swells, reminding me of Leia’s journey to come, and I imagine how Breha might have mothered the iconic princess. Breha wants a daughter, not just to train as an heir, but to love. Bail would have been busy on Coruscant for weeks or months at a time, resisting the Emperor as he siphoned away the Senate’s power—hardly a safe place for a young girl. Even though Breha was queen of a whole planet, I doubt Leia was reared by droids in a lonely nursery. “As a girl growing up and seeing Star Wars, of course you want to be Princess Leia. And to know that I’m actually playing her mother . . . I just kept thinking about those buns! . . . Maybe I taught her how to do those buns!” —Rebecca Jackson Mendoza, the actress who portrayed Breha Organa in Revenge of the Sith Leia’s title isn’t “junior senator” or “representative,” or some other role connected to the Senate. It’s “princess.” Early drafts of A New Hope name Leia as the daughter of Queen Breha, almost 30 years before her on-screen debut. Leia...

Attack on Titan Reminds us to Value Our Origins May10

Attack on Titan Reminds us to Value Our Origins...

I come from a region known for ignorance and stupidity. In media, residents of the Southern United States are often portrayed as unintelligent people with thick accents. I can’t tell you how many cartoons I’ve seen with a character in overalls, a piece of wheat hanging from his mouth, driveling with an obnoxious southern drawl. Because of this stigma, in the past I’ve detested using southern words like “y’all” or “buggie.” I didn’t pick up the southern accent on purpose. Sometimes I’ve wished I was from somewhere else, so I didn’t feel like I had to continuously prove that I’m not an idiot. Attack on Titan’s Sasha Braus felt the same way about her humble beginnings. She grew up with her father in the woods, struggling to find food that they hunted with bows and arrows. She also adopted her father’s deep southern accent. When she decided to join the 104th training corps in the military, she changed her accent, carefully choosing her words to make sure no one knew what she really sounded like and thus disguising where she came from. The places I came from formed who we I am and will always be a part of me no matter where I go. At one point, one of her fellow trainees, Ymir, calls her out for “acting too nice,” accusing her of covering up how she feels and being a fake. Another trainee named Krista Lenz defends Sasha, saying that she likes how Sasha talks and that “her words are her own.” In Season Two, Sasha is forced to return to her village to warn her people of an oncoming titan attack. Memories rush back to her about her home and who she is. There she finds a young girl trapped by...

Episode 79 – Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 May09

Episode 79 – Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2...

The only podcast that’s still hooked on a feelin’, it’s Infinity +1! This week Jason, Allison, and Kyle gush all about seeing Marvel’s latest movie, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and celebrate it the traditional way, with a Guardians-themed Conundrum. ***All spoilers are contained in the second half of the podcast*** Then in the second segment, our hosts share their favourite moments from the movie, how their expectations were met or subverted, and rank it among the rest of the films of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Question of the Week: Who’s the perfect villain for your super-squad? The song in the break is GB Hauz by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Princess Leia’s Stolen Death Star Plans by Palette-Swap Ninja Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @AllisonBarron12 Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Your Name Demonstrates Love over Distance May08

Your Name Demonstrates Love over Distance...

In a number of east Asian countries, there’s a concept known as the red string of fate. Frequently portrayed in anime and manga, it’s a red cord, invisible to the human eye, connecting two people, usually in a romantic sense. No matter how far apart they are or what obstacles stand in their way, the pair’s fingers (and hearts) are always linked. It’s a charming idea, but one that doesn’t seem to fit in this modern world. I wonder, what would happen if that antiquated string was traded for a digital thread? Would modern technology change the way we view love? Your Name (Kimi no Na wa), the animated film from Makoto Shinkai that became one of Japan’s all-time highest grossing movies, explores the ideas of romance, fate, and digital technology. It features an unlikely pair: Mitsuha, the eldest daughter in a family tied to a rural community’s Shinto shrine, and Taki, a boy who lives in the megacity of Tokyo and works part-time as a waiter and bus boy. Tied together through a supernatural and cosmic phenomenon, the high schoolers begin switching bodies on a regular basis; the only way they can communicate with one another about the situation is by leaving messages on notepads, scribbling marks on their own bodies, and more typically, typing in a journaling app on their phones. I can work to love those people in my life that are otherwise separated from me. Their odd way of communication is played for laughs as they chronicle their days, often laying down ground rules and leaving snarky remarks, for each other. That surface-level conversation reminds me of my own smartphone habits. I’m frequently in dialogue with friends through Facebook, Twitter, and other apps, and though I communicate with more people...

Surprised by Moms May05

Surprised by Moms

My wife made our youngest son a Companion Cube cake for this seventeenth birthday. Instead of singing the usual “Happy Birthday,” she delivered it to the table with a pitch-perfect rendition of “Still Alive.” Nearly a decade later, that moment still stands out in his memory. He was surprised by—and delighted with—his mom’s unexpected geek cred. Moms can surprise us if we let them. In Sing!, a movie about talking animals and a singing competition, Rosita doesn’t necessarily want to surprise her family, but she wishes she had a little more of their support. When we first meet her, she’s working in the kitchen trying to get her brood of piglets ready for school. Katy Perry’s “Firework” is playing on the radio and Rosita sings along. She even manages a couple of dance steps between the sink and the table. The mood is broken when one her piglets jumps up on the table and entertains his siblings by making fun of her singing. She appeals to her husband, asking him to tell their brood what a good singer she is. You would think that after fifty-two years, I’d know my mother pretty well. “Oh yeah you were great, honey,” he says. Then adds, “by the way the bathroom sink is blocked again.” It’s a shame Rosita didn’t sing a bit more. Maybe her family would have heard the lyrics and realized they were missing something important. Do you ever feel Already buried deep Six feet under Screams but no one seems to hear a thing Do you know that there’s Still a chance for you ‘Cause there’s a spark in you Rosita has a spark—a genuine and surprising talent—but no one in the family can see it. I wonder how often I’ve been blind...

All Who Wander: The Return of the King Book 1 May04

All Who Wander: The Return of the King Book 1...

Mae govannen, fellow wanderers, and welcome to episode seven of All Who Wander, the in-depth audio exploration of one of J. R. R. Tolkien’s most famous works, The Lord of the Rings. In this episode, Allison and Kyla are joined again by the mithril man himself, Michael Boyce, to look into the nooks and crannies of The Return of the King. What’s so special about the Paths of the Dead? Who takes credit for felling the King of the Nazgûl? And wait, Sauron has a mouth? Download and subscribe to the Infinity +1 feed on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Allison’s Twitter: @AllisonBarron12 Kyla’s Twitter: @rlandnews Michael’s Twitter: @mwboyce Geekdom House on Twitter:...

Meet the Geekdom House Staff: Kyle Rudge May03

Meet the Geekdom House Staff: Kyle Rudge...

Who are the people behind Geekdom House and what do they do? You well might ask, but question no longer, because Casey Covel has gone deep into the trenches to determine who we are and what you need to know. Today’s biography and nerd-cred heavy questions are all about our Admiral and Founder, Kyle Rudge. As though by prophetic destiny, Kyle always knew it was his mission to minister to the often-misunderstood and belittled geek culture. Geekdom House and its special features are largely inspired by key events that took place in Kyle’s backstory. An impromptu sing-along of “Hero of Canton” during a pre-screening of Serenity opened Kyle’s eyes to how geek culture is used to create community, as small pockets of chatting friends dissolved and the entire theater evolved into one large friend group. This “eureka moment” led to the establishment of Geekdom House’s Wandering Minstrels choir. With community at the forefront of his legendary quest, Kyle wields the power of facilitation—the ability to create conversation involving all walks of life, bringing out others’ beliefs, values, and personal stories for discussion and growth. “The medium is the message” is the mantra on Kyle’s proverbial standard, and it’s most apparent during Geekdom House Live! nights, where what is said is never as important as how it is said. With the Deity of all Creativity behind him, Kyle sees no reason why he and others who practice the Christian faith can’t step up their creativity game and contribute something meaningful and unique to the geek culture. Kyle is a self-proclaimed jack-of-all-trades. His resume is littered with more details than the Marauder’s Map—collaborating with music artists, owning a web and media company, hosting a radio station, acting as an air traffic controller, working with national non-profits…...

Episode 78 – Kyle’s Interview / Ghost in the Shell May02

Episode 78 – Kyle’s Interview / Ghost in the Shell...

The only podcast that knows Sonic would whoop Mario’s butt in the Olympics, it’s Infinity +1! Jason, Allison, and Kyle give their answers to the final Question of the Week in the archetype series, and pick apart everything Kyle said in his interview with Casey Covel. Then in the second segment, the new Ghost in the Shell movie harkens back to many of classic science fiction’s classic problems. Your hosts are here to dig into each one to uncover even more of the moral quandaries asked by Dustin Schellenberg and Kevin Cummings in their articles Rage Against the Humanity and Who Is Mira Killian? Question of the Week: Who’s your favourite hero? The song in the break is Failing Job Prospects by Lazy Nerd 204 [used with permission] Download and subscribe to Infinity +1 on iTunes, Stitcher and Google Play Music now! RSS Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekdomhouse/infinitypodcast Jason’s Twitter: @VorpalJason Kyle’s Twitter: @videogamefaith Allison’s Twitter: @AllisonBarron12 Geekdom House on Twitter: @GeekdomHouse Geekdom House on Twitch: OKLetsPlay Buy original Geekdom House merchandise from...

Rage Against the Humanity May01

Rage Against the Humanity...

Mira is the combination of the best parts of humanity and robot. That’s what the live action film Ghost in the Shell opens by saying, anyway. She combines the mind of a human with its ability to think for itself, respond to changing environments and reason out solutions with the strength and durability of a robotic frame. But is the mind the best part of what it means to be human? The human mind can do some extraordinary things. It has the ability to take in and sort stimuli from multiple sources in a near instant. It can decide on its own what to pay various levels of attention to, and even how to interpret that attention from the gentle touch that tickles to the sharp pain of a cut. It can also use that information to formulate plans that can be changed on the fly. The brain can set out to accomplish a task and as information comes in, alter, change, or completely rewrite the plan to accomplish a goal. Memory and humanity are linked. This is the ability that Cutter is after when he implants Mira’s brain into a robotic shell. He’s looking for a robot that adapts to meet a changing battlefield. He wants a weapon that has instinct, a machine that can serve him not based on logarithms and if/then statements, but with the natural ability of a human being. The problem with his plan, though, is that the human brain is not just an adaptive algorithm computer. It contains something else, something strange and beautiful that makes a human a person: a soul. In the movie, this phenomenon is referred to as a “ghost.” Whether you call it spirit, soul, ruach adoni, or ghost, it is the thing that...