You Are, and Always Will Be, My Friend Jun27

You Are, and Always Will Be, My Friend...

One of the many reasons I love Star Trek is that the series highlights friendships. The romances come and go, but the friendships, when the right effort is put in, endure. It reminds me of my own experience. I only have a handful of friends who have withstood the test of time, and they mean the world to me. In Star Trek: Into Darkness, many of the characters display key factors to working, lasting friendships. This diverse crew struggles through much conflict, whether it stems from outside circumstances or their own biases and emotions. But when push comes to shove, the crew of the Enterprise are steadfast and enduring. I especially appreciate the attributes of trust, honesty, forgiveness, acceptance, and sacrifice they exhibit. Sulu and Trust For the Enterprise to run smoothly, the crew has to put their faith in each other, especially in cases such as letting a crewmember command as acting captain. When Kirk goes with Spock onto a Klingon-space planet, he leaves Sulu in charge to manage the ship. Though McCoy is nervous about this situation, Kirk has enough trust and confidence in Sulu that he can get the job done, which he does. Giving control over to someone else and trusting them to get the job done can be challenging, especially if you are one of those people who likes to do everything yourself. Trusting someone else when the stakes are high is the mark of true friendship. It is difficult to be honest, especially when honesty could mean jeopardizing a job or a relationship. McCoy and Honesty It is difficult to be honest, especially when honesty could mean jeopardizing something important to you, like a job or a relationship. McCoy is candid with Kirk despite the possible repercussions. He plays the devil’s advocate to many of...

Becoming Stone May25

Becoming Stone

Sometimes I wish I didn’t feel emotions at all. Sure, the good ones are great; who doesn’t want to feel joy, hope, satisfaction, or delight? But the bad ones terrify me. Grief, fear, regret, loneliness… no, thank you. In the Song of the Sea, Ben begins his life as a happy child with a loving father, Conor, and a gentle mother, Bronach, who loves to teach her son stories and songs. One of her many fantastical tales is about the Owl Witch Macha. Long ago, Macha’s son endured a great tragedy, plunging him into despair. Because Macha couldn’t bear to see the pain in her son, she turned him into stone. However, she didn’t stop there. On Halloween night, she sent out her owls to cleanse faeries and humans of their emotions. Soon after telling her son this story, Bronach dies while giving birth to Ben’s younger sister, Saoirse. Years later, Ben has grown bitter and jealous of Saoirse. Negative emotions surround him—from his own jealousy and terror of the sea that surrounds their lighthouse home, to a grieving father, to a cynical granny. I imagine there were many times he wished he could be turned to stone like the faeries in his mother’s story. It is when Granny takes Ben and Saoirse to the city that he learns his sister is a selkie and that she has the ability to play a shell that releases faeries from stone prisons. His mother’s story is true. After Macha captures Saoirse and Ben, he confronts her. The Owl Witch feels that she needs to rid the world of “nasty emotions” because “nobody needs them,” that they make everyone “feel awful.” So deep are her ideals, she even draws the good and bad emotions out of herself...

The Heart of a Girl on Fire Apr25

The Heart of a Girl on Fire...

Katniss Everdeen, the Girl on Fire, is a symbol in her dystopian world of Panem. In the story, she touches the hearts of the districts, yet I’ve often heard people who’ve seen the movies describe her as calloused, mean, and even heartless. How can someone with those descriptors be a positive emblem of hope for a fictional nation and millions of viewers across our globe? I believe that despite Katniss’s harsh exterior cultivated by her background, she has a compassionate heart that surpasses even Peeta Mellark’s. Self-Sacrifice in The Hunger Games Katniss volunteers to take the place of her younger sister, Prim, in the Hunger Games. This is the catalyst of the entire story, but she furthers this sacrificial nature in her protection of Rue during the Games. Katniss doesn’t even know Rue well, but the District 11 girl’s innocence and similarities to Prim spur Katniss to fight for her. This movie brings out Katniss’s sacrificial nature the most. The scene where she decorates Rue with wildflowers after her death is her way of showing her love for a girl she barely knew and rebelling against the Capitol. Compassion in Catching Fire When the Peacekeepers raid District 12, Katniss notices the elderly Greasy Sae is injured. Katniss takes the old woman aside and gently uses a cold cloth to help her eye. During tribute training in the Capitol, Haymitch and Peeta urge Katniss to ally herself with the bigger, stronger victors. Who does Katniss choose? The rejects and the elderly. She connects with these “lesser” individuals—namely, Mags, Beetee, and Wiress. She sees past their seemingly weak exteriors and recognizes their skills. More importantly, she values them as human beings. Amidst the 75th Hunger Games, Wiress is in shock after enduring a trap that coated...